Tag Archives: writing exercise

I’m a Writer’s Digest Affiliate Now!

confetti

I’m really excited about this news, you guys! I absolutely LOVE Writer’s Digest products, and I use them all the time. When I get my own YouTube Channel set up, you’ll see me reviewing them there pretty regularly. So, this is me just giving you a heads-up that I may now make some revenue if you choose to click certain Writer’s Digest links you find on my blog!

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I'm a Writer's Digest Affiliate Now!

confetti

I’m really excited about this news, you guys! I absolutely LOVE Writer’s Digest products, and I use them all the time. When I get my own YouTube Channel set up, you’ll see me reviewing them there pretty regularly. So, this is me just giving you a heads-up that I may now make some revenue if you choose to click certain Writer’s Digest links you find on my blog!

Free Shipping on $25


Honing Your Horror Workshop: Part 3

 


Honing Your Horror Workshop: Part 2

 


Honing Your Horror Workshop: Part 1

Here’s the video from my first writing workshop hosted at The Creative Kitchen in Bay Minette! HUGE shout-out to the owner, Lacey Collier, for working with me and hosting my events!


Are You Called To Write?

Have you ever had a thought like this? Man, I’d really love to write a book someday, but I have no idea where to start.

I used to have similar thoughts, but I worked my butt off over the past 11 years, and I’ve been published in Flash Fiction Magazine, Noir Nation No. 3, as well as having self-published A Collection of Reflections (poetry) and Frost: An Otherworld Tale (my debut novel).

If you love a good story, that love is all you need to become a writer. I’ve invested a lifetime of passion and thousands of dollars in learning about writing craft and the publishing industry, and I’d love to share what I’ve learned with those of you who have an inner storyteller begging to get out.

If you’d like to learn more, you can reserve your seat at my upcoming writing workshop dates HERE. The workshops will be held at The Creative Kitchen in my aweome hometown of Bay Minette, Alabama.

Here’s a fun exercise for those of you considering attending the workshop (or anyone who wants to join in, for that matter):

Describe your worst fear in a single paragraph, but there’s a catch; you cannot name your fear in the paragraph. Post your answers in the comments and we’ll try to guess your fear!


Work It #14 from A Writer's Guide to Persistence by Jordan Rosenfeld – Part 3

Work It #14 from A Writer’s Guide to Persistence by Jordan Rosenfeld

Chapter 14: Relish Revision

Choose a scene or a chapter or a paragraph that is in the first-draft stage (or write a fresh one). You’re going to do three drafts (it’s okay if you break this up over several days). Follow these steps.

  1. Make sure all the elements of a scene are included: The character has an obvious, consistent point of view; your sensory descriptions and imagery show setting and emotion; the action creates a sense of real-time movement and/or dialogue, and a plot goal is present, some piece of which is apparent in this scene.
  2. Cut all flabby, extraneous language, such as adverbs, adjectives, “telling” language, and pleasantries between characters. Hone your sentences. Strive for clarity and beauty.
  3. Add a “push-pull” energyof tension to any dialogue or interaction between characters.

Today, I’m going to take the revised scene from yesterday, and I’m going to apply step 2 of Jordan’s revision advice.

I’ve had a hell of a day. By 8:00 this morning I was struggling to keep my eyes open, fighting exhaustion and trying to focus on what the physical therapist was saying about my husband’s grandmother’s rehabilitation exercises. I know it makes me sound like a jerk, but the harder I tried to focus, the more I caught myself nodding off after a sleepless night. Every time my head bobbed, I would blink and squint into the hospital lighting. I bet you’re wondering how I could be that tired.

Well, our black and tan coonhounds Bear and Bryant paced around our vintage two-bedroom home, bayed, and howled all night, as if there were a prowler in the yard, but every time we looked, we couldn’t see a damn thing. The dogs quieted between 3:45 and 4:15 this morning. We were drifting off to sleep when we heard a nerve-shattering crash out in the shop.

By the time we made it out to the cinderblock structure, whatever knocked over our shelf of tools and racecar parts was gone. The shelf busted the Lexan window out of the back of my husband’s ’67 Camaro drag car. It gouged the crimson paint job in a couple places and dented the trunk. The Camaro is my husband’s baby, and to say that he was upset is an understatement.

We spent the two hours before he had to go to work cleaning the shop. After that, I had to drag my ass to Mobile Infirmary with my mother-in-law and sister-in-law to learn how to do rehab for Granny. I tried to push through my mind-numbing exhaustion and stay awake, but my body at 26 can’t bounce back from lack of sleep as well as it could when I was 16. I was fine when we were standing up and moving, but when the physical therapist took us into a room with a couch, I was done for.

The moment I sank down onto the cushions and felt the morning sun beating down on me through the window, I knew I was doomed. The more the physical therapist talked, the heavier my eyelids got. After a minute, I decided it would be easier for me to listen with my eyes closed. I felt a sense of guilt as the physical therapist’s voice got muffled, but it was suppressed by the sleep that overtook me. I don’t know how long I slept before I got jarred out of my dozing off by my husband’s “Yea, Alabama!” ringtone. “Hello?” My voice was drowsy.

“Babe…I know you’re at the hospital with Granny, but I wanted to call and let you know that my truck burned to the ground today while I was at a job site.”

I was awake in an instant, and my heart started pounding with violence at the news. It pounded until I could feel my pulse in my fingertips. “WHAT?! Oh, my GOD! How the hell did that happen?!”

I could feel myself shaking, and saw the three women in the physical therapy room with me pale at my words. I tapped the speaker button on my phone so my husband’s grandmother, mother, and sister could hear his reply.

“Cops say it looks like a Molotov cocktail started the blaze. Everything that was in the truck is gone…burned to ashes. My granddaddy’s truck and some poor excuse for a human being burned it to the ground. I don’t know who’d do something like that, but they should pray I don’t get my hands on their sorry ass is all I can say.”

He may not have known…but I had an idea of who would do something like that to my husband. I’d been trying to handle the problems I was having at work myself because I didn’t want to be the girl who cried wolf. I didn’t want to overreact. I didn’t want to be the histrionic personality that people assumed I was. My mouth went dry and my tongue felt like sandpaper as I struggled to work up the courage to reply.

[I’d love to know what you guys think of this revision! Thanks!]


Work It #14 from A Writer’s Guide to Persistence by Jordan Rosenfeld – Part 3

Work It #14 from A Writer’s Guide to Persistence by Jordan Rosenfeld

Chapter 14: Relish Revision

Choose a scene or a chapter or a paragraph that is in the first-draft stage (or write a fresh one). You’re going to do three drafts (it’s okay if you break this up over several days). Follow these steps.

  1. Make sure all the elements of a scene are included: The character has an obvious, consistent point of view; your sensory descriptions and imagery show setting and emotion; the action creates a sense of real-time movement and/or dialogue, and a plot goal is present, some piece of which is apparent in this scene.
  2. Cut all flabby, extraneous language, such as adverbs, adjectives, “telling” language, and pleasantries between characters. Hone your sentences. Strive for clarity and beauty.
  3. Add a “push-pull” energyof tension to any dialogue or interaction between characters.

Today, I’m going to take the revised scene from yesterday, and I’m going to apply step 2 of Jordan’s revision advice.

I’ve had a hell of a day. By 8:00 this morning I was struggling to keep my eyes open, fighting exhaustion and trying to focus on what the physical therapist was saying about my husband’s grandmother’s rehabilitation exercises. I know it makes me sound like a jerk, but the harder I tried to focus, the more I caught myself nodding off after a sleepless night. Every time my head bobbed, I would blink and squint into the hospital lighting. I bet you’re wondering how I could be that tired.

Well, our black and tan coonhounds Bear and Bryant paced around our vintage two-bedroom home, bayed, and howled all night, as if there were a prowler in the yard, but every time we looked, we couldn’t see a damn thing. The dogs quieted between 3:45 and 4:15 this morning. We were drifting off to sleep when we heard a nerve-shattering crash out in the shop.

By the time we made it out to the cinderblock structure, whatever knocked over our shelf of tools and racecar parts was gone. The shelf busted the Lexan window out of the back of my husband’s ’67 Camaro drag car. It gouged the crimson paint job in a couple places and dented the trunk. The Camaro is my husband’s baby, and to say that he was upset is an understatement.

We spent the two hours before he had to go to work cleaning the shop. After that, I had to drag my ass to Mobile Infirmary with my mother-in-law and sister-in-law to learn how to do rehab for Granny. I tried to push through my mind-numbing exhaustion and stay awake, but my body at 26 can’t bounce back from lack of sleep as well as it could when I was 16. I was fine when we were standing up and moving, but when the physical therapist took us into a room with a couch, I was done for.

The moment I sank down onto the cushions and felt the morning sun beating down on me through the window, I knew I was doomed. The more the physical therapist talked, the heavier my eyelids got. After a minute, I decided it would be easier for me to listen with my eyes closed. I felt a sense of guilt as the physical therapist’s voice got muffled, but it was suppressed by the sleep that overtook me. I don’t know how long I slept before I got jarred out of my dozing off by my husband’s “Yea, Alabama!” ringtone. “Hello?” My voice was drowsy.

“Babe…I know you’re at the hospital with Granny, but I wanted to call and let you know that my truck burned to the ground today while I was at a job site.”

I was awake in an instant, and my heart started pounding with violence at the news. It pounded until I could feel my pulse in my fingertips. “WHAT?! Oh, my GOD! How the hell did that happen?!”

I could feel myself shaking, and saw the three women in the physical therapy room with me pale at my words. I tapped the speaker button on my phone so my husband’s grandmother, mother, and sister could hear his reply.

“Cops say it looks like a Molotov cocktail started the blaze. Everything that was in the truck is gone…burned to ashes. My granddaddy’s truck and some poor excuse for a human being burned it to the ground. I don’t know who’d do something like that, but they should pray I don’t get my hands on their sorry ass is all I can say.”

He may not have known…but I had an idea of who would do something like that to my husband. I’d been trying to handle the problems I was having at work myself because I didn’t want to be the girl who cried wolf. I didn’t want to overreact. I didn’t want to be the histrionic personality that people assumed I was. My mouth went dry and my tongue felt like sandpaper as I struggled to work up the courage to reply.

[I’d love to know what you guys think of this revision! Thanks!]


Work it #14 from A Writer’s Guide to Persistence by Jordan Rosenfeld – Part 2

Work It #14 from A Writer’s Guide to Persistence by Jordan Rosenfeld

Chapter 14: Relish Revision

Choose a scene or a chapter or a paragraph that is in the first-draft stage (or write a fresh one). You’re going to do three drafts (it’s okay if you break this up over several days). Follow these steps.

  1. Make sure all the elements of a scene are included: The character has an obvious, consistent point of view; your sensory descriptions and imagery show setting and emotion; the action creates a sense of real-time movement and/or dialogue, and a plot goal is present, some piece of which is apparent in this scene.
  2. Cut all flabby, extraneous language, such as adverbs, adjectives, “telling” language, and pleasantries between characters. Hone your sentences. Strive for clarity and beauty.
  3. Add a “push-pull” energyof tension to any dialogue or interaction between characters.

Today, I’m going to take the first draft of the scene from yesterday, and I’m going to apply step 1 of Jordan’s revision advice.

I’ve had a hell of a day. By 8:00 this morning I was struggling to hold my eyes open, fighting abject exhaustion and trying to focus on what the physical therapist was saying about my husband’s grandmother’s rehabilitation exercises. I know it sounds kind of bad, but the harder I tried to focus, the more I caught myself nodding off after a long, sleepless night. Every time my head bobbed, I would blink and squint into the too-bright fluorescent hospital lighting. I bet you’re wondering how I could possibly be that tired, right?

Well, our black and tan coonhounds Bear and Bryant paced around our small but cozy vintage two-bedroom home, bayed, and howled all night long, as if there were a prowler in the yard, but every time we looked, we couldn’t see a damn thing. The dogs finally got quiet sometime between 3:45 and 4:15 this morning, and then we heard a nerve-shattering crash out in the shop.

By the time we made it out to the open-faced cinderblock structure, whatever knocked our shelf of tools and racecar parts over was gone. The shelf busted the Lexan back window out of my husband’s ’67 Camaro drag car. It gouged the crimson paint job in a couple places, and left dents in a couple more, and that was a damn bad way to start the day. The Camaro is my husband’s baby, and to say that he was upset is a grave understatement.

So, we got two hours of sleep, he had to go to work, and I had to drag my exhausted ass to Mobile Infirmary with my mother-in-law and sister-in-law to learn how to properly do rehab for Granny. I tried to push through my mind-numbing exhaustion and stay awake, but my body at 26 just can’t bounce back from lack of sleep like it could when I was 16. I was fine when we were standing up and moving around, but when the physical therapist took us into a private room with a comfortable couch I was done for.

The moment I sank down onto the overstuffed, floral cushions and felt the morning sun beating down on me through the window, I knew I was doomed. The more the physical therapist talked in her most pleasant, soothing voice, the heavier my eyelids got. After a few minutes, I decided it would be easier for me to listen with my eyes closed. I felt a nagging sense of guilt as the physical therapist’s voice got fuzzier and farther away, but it was suppressed by the dreamless sleep that overtook me. Some time later, I wasn’t sure how long, I got jarred out of my dozing off by my husband’s “Yea, Alabama!” ringtone. “Hello?” My voice was thick and husky with drowsiness.

“Babe…I know you’re at the hospital with Granny, but I just wanted to call and let you know that my truck burned to the ground today while I was away at a job site.”

I was wide awake in an instant, and my heart was pounding so hard at the news that I could feel my pulse in my fingertips. “WHAT?! Oh my GOD! How the hell did that happen?!”

I could feel myself shaking, and saw the other three women in the physical therapy room with me go still, breathless, and pale at my words. I tapped the speaker button on my phone so my husband’s grandmother, mother, and sister could hear his reply.

“Cops say it looks like a Molotov cocktail started the blaze. Everything that was in the truck is gone…burned completely up. My granddaddy’s truck and some sorry excuse for a human being burned it to the ground. I don’t know who’d do something like that, but they better pray I don’t get my hands on their sorry ass is all I can say.”

He may not have known…but I had a pretty good idea of who would do something like that to my husband. I’d been trying to handle the problems I was having at work myself because I didn’t want to be the girl who cried wolf. I didn’t want to overreact. I didn’t want to be the histrionic personality that so many people assumed I was. My mouth went dry and my tongue felt like sandpaper as I struggled to work up the courage to reply.

[I’d love to know what you guys think of this first revision! Thanks!]


Work it #14 from A Writer's Guide to Persistence by Jordan Rosenfeld – Part 2

Work It #14 from A Writer’s Guide to Persistence by Jordan Rosenfeld

Chapter 14: Relish Revision

Choose a scene or a chapter or a paragraph that is in the first-draft stage (or write a fresh one). You’re going to do three drafts (it’s okay if you break this up over several days). Follow these steps.

  1. Make sure all the elements of a scene are included: The character has an obvious, consistent point of view; your sensory descriptions and imagery show setting and emotion; the action creates a sense of real-time movement and/or dialogue, and a plot goal is present, some piece of which is apparent in this scene.
  2. Cut all flabby, extraneous language, such as adverbs, adjectives, “telling” language, and pleasantries between characters. Hone your sentences. Strive for clarity and beauty.
  3. Add a “push-pull” energyof tension to any dialogue or interaction between characters.

Today, I’m going to take the first draft of the scene from yesterday, and I’m going to apply step 1 of Jordan’s revision advice.

I’ve had a hell of a day. By 8:00 this morning I was struggling to hold my eyes open, fighting abject exhaustion and trying to focus on what the physical therapist was saying about my husband’s grandmother’s rehabilitation exercises. I know it sounds kind of bad, but the harder I tried to focus, the more I caught myself nodding off after a long, sleepless night. Every time my head bobbed, I would blink and squint into the too-bright fluorescent hospital lighting. I bet you’re wondering how I could possibly be that tired, right?

Well, our black and tan coonhounds Bear and Bryant paced around our small but cozy vintage two-bedroom home, bayed, and howled all night long, as if there were a prowler in the yard, but every time we looked, we couldn’t see a damn thing. The dogs finally got quiet sometime between 3:45 and 4:15 this morning, and then we heard a nerve-shattering crash out in the shop.

By the time we made it out to the open-faced cinderblock structure, whatever knocked our shelf of tools and racecar parts over was gone. The shelf busted the Lexan back window out of my husband’s ’67 Camaro drag car. It gouged the crimson paint job in a couple places, and left dents in a couple more, and that was a damn bad way to start the day. The Camaro is my husband’s baby, and to say that he was upset is a grave understatement.

So, we got two hours of sleep, he had to go to work, and I had to drag my exhausted ass to Mobile Infirmary with my mother-in-law and sister-in-law to learn how to properly do rehab for Granny. I tried to push through my mind-numbing exhaustion and stay awake, but my body at 26 just can’t bounce back from lack of sleep like it could when I was 16. I was fine when we were standing up and moving around, but when the physical therapist took us into a private room with a comfortable couch I was done for.

The moment I sank down onto the overstuffed, floral cushions and felt the morning sun beating down on me through the window, I knew I was doomed. The more the physical therapist talked in her most pleasant, soothing voice, the heavier my eyelids got. After a few minutes, I decided it would be easier for me to listen with my eyes closed. I felt a nagging sense of guilt as the physical therapist’s voice got fuzzier and farther away, but it was suppressed by the dreamless sleep that overtook me. Some time later, I wasn’t sure how long, I got jarred out of my dozing off by my husband’s “Yea, Alabama!” ringtone. “Hello?” My voice was thick and husky with drowsiness.

“Babe…I know you’re at the hospital with Granny, but I just wanted to call and let you know that my truck burned to the ground today while I was away at a job site.”

I was wide awake in an instant, and my heart was pounding so hard at the news that I could feel my pulse in my fingertips. “WHAT?! Oh my GOD! How the hell did that happen?!”

I could feel myself shaking, and saw the other three women in the physical therapy room with me go still, breathless, and pale at my words. I tapped the speaker button on my phone so my husband’s grandmother, mother, and sister could hear his reply.

“Cops say it looks like a Molotov cocktail started the blaze. Everything that was in the truck is gone…burned completely up. My granddaddy’s truck and some sorry excuse for a human being burned it to the ground. I don’t know who’d do something like that, but they better pray I don’t get my hands on their sorry ass is all I can say.”

He may not have known…but I had a pretty good idea of who would do something like that to my husband. I’d been trying to handle the problems I was having at work myself because I didn’t want to be the girl who cried wolf. I didn’t want to overreact. I didn’t want to be the histrionic personality that so many people assumed I was. My mouth went dry and my tongue felt like sandpaper as I struggled to work up the courage to reply.

[I’d love to know what you guys think of this first revision! Thanks!]


Work It #14 from A Writer’s Guide to Persistence by Jordan Rosenfeld – Part 1

Work It #14 from A Writer’s Guide to Persistence by Jordan Rosenfeld

Chapter 14: Relish Revision

Choose a scene or a chapter or a paragraph that is in the first-draft stage (or write a fresh one). You’re going to do three drafts (it’s okay if you break this up over several days). Follow these steps.

  1. Make sure all the elements of a scene are included: The character has an obvious, consistent point of view; your sensory descriptions and imagery show setting and emotion; the action creates a sense of real-time movement and/or dialogue, and a plot goal is present, some piece of which is apparent in this scene.
  2. Cut all flabby, extraneous language, such as adverbs, adjectives, “telling” language, and pleasantries between characters. Hone your sentences. Strive for clarity and beauty.
  3. Add a “push-pull” energyof tension to any dialogue or interaction between characters.

Today, I’m going to just share my paragraph that’s in its first-draft stage.

I’ve had a hell of a day. By 8:00 this morning I was struggling to hold my eyes open, fighting abject exhaustion and trying to focus on what the physical therapist was saying about my husband’s grandmother’s rehabilitation exercises. I know it sounds kind of bad, but the harder I tried to focus, the more I caught myself nodding off after a long, sleepless night.

Our black and tan coonhounds Bear and Bryant paced, bayed, and howled all night, as if there were a prowler in the yard, but every time we looked, we couldn’t see a damn thing. The dogs finally got quiet some time between 3:45 and 4:15, and then we heard a nerve-shattering crash out in the shop.

By the time we made it out there, whatever knocked our shelf of tools and racecar parts over was gone. The shelf busted the Lexan back window out of my husband’s ’67 Camaro drag car. It gouged the crimson paint job in a couple places, and left dents in a couple more, and that was a damn bad way to start the day. The Camaro is my husband’s baby.

So, we got two hours of sleep, and he had to go to work, and I had to drag my exhausted ass to Mobile with my mother-in-law and sister-in-law to learn how to properly do rehab for Granny. I tried to push through and stay awake, but my body at 26 just can’t bounce back from lack of sleep like it could when I was 16.

Then I got jarred out of my dozing off by my husband’s ringtone. “Hello?”

“Babe…I know you’re at the hospital with Granny, but I just wanted to call and let you know that my truck burned to the ground today while I was away at a job site.”

“WHAT?! Oh my GOD! How the hell did that happen?!”

“Cops say it looks like a Malitov cocktail started the blaze. Everything that was in the truck is gone…burned completely up. My granddaddy’s truck, and some sorry excuse for a human being burned it to the ground. I don’t know who’d do something like that, but they better pray I don’t get my hands on their sorry ass is all I can say.”

He may not have known…but I sure did.


Work It #14 from A Writer's Guide to Persistence by Jordan Rosenfeld – Part 1

Work It #14 from A Writer’s Guide to Persistence by Jordan Rosenfeld

Chapter 14: Relish Revision

Choose a scene or a chapter or a paragraph that is in the first-draft stage (or write a fresh one). You’re going to do three drafts (it’s okay if you break this up over several days). Follow these steps.

  1. Make sure all the elements of a scene are included: The character has an obvious, consistent point of view; your sensory descriptions and imagery show setting and emotion; the action creates a sense of real-time movement and/or dialogue, and a plot goal is present, some piece of which is apparent in this scene.
  2. Cut all flabby, extraneous language, such as adverbs, adjectives, “telling” language, and pleasantries between characters. Hone your sentences. Strive for clarity and beauty.
  3. Add a “push-pull” energyof tension to any dialogue or interaction between characters.

Today, I’m going to just share my paragraph that’s in its first-draft stage.

I’ve had a hell of a day. By 8:00 this morning I was struggling to hold my eyes open, fighting abject exhaustion and trying to focus on what the physical therapist was saying about my husband’s grandmother’s rehabilitation exercises. I know it sounds kind of bad, but the harder I tried to focus, the more I caught myself nodding off after a long, sleepless night.

Our black and tan coonhounds Bear and Bryant paced, bayed, and howled all night, as if there were a prowler in the yard, but every time we looked, we couldn’t see a damn thing. The dogs finally got quiet some time between 3:45 and 4:15, and then we heard a nerve-shattering crash out in the shop.

By the time we made it out there, whatever knocked our shelf of tools and racecar parts over was gone. The shelf busted the Lexan back window out of my husband’s ’67 Camaro drag car. It gouged the crimson paint job in a couple places, and left dents in a couple more, and that was a damn bad way to start the day. The Camaro is my husband’s baby.

So, we got two hours of sleep, and he had to go to work, and I had to drag my exhausted ass to Mobile with my mother-in-law and sister-in-law to learn how to properly do rehab for Granny. I tried to push through and stay awake, but my body at 26 just can’t bounce back from lack of sleep like it could when I was 16.

Then I got jarred out of my dozing off by my husband’s ringtone. “Hello?”

“Babe…I know you’re at the hospital with Granny, but I just wanted to call and let you know that my truck burned to the ground today while I was away at a job site.”

“WHAT?! Oh my GOD! How the hell did that happen?!”

“Cops say it looks like a Malitov cocktail started the blaze. Everything that was in the truck is gone…burned completely up. My granddaddy’s truck, and some sorry excuse for a human being burned it to the ground. I don’t know who’d do something like that, but they better pray I don’t get my hands on their sorry ass is all I can say.”

He may not have known…but I sure did.


Work It #11 from A Writer’s Guide to Persistence by Jordan Rosenfeld

Work it #11 from A Writer’s Guide to Persistence by Jordan Rosenfeld

Chapter 11: Be Bold, Write Bravely

Okay, it’s time to determine your level of boldness with a set of questions. When you determine what your comfort levels are, you know what “boldness” means to you. Boldness is taking steps outside your comfort zone. You don’t have to take huge, risky steps; you can start with small ones (and we’ll talk more about those in chapter thirteen, “Stretch Your Skills,”), but first we start with identifying your current comfort zone.

Answer the following questions with a yes or no. Are you comfortable…

  • revealing personal feelings in your writing? NO
  • showing your failings or humanity? NO
  • publicly sharing your mistakes? NO
  • using strong language? YES
  • writing about taboo subjects? NO
  • writing about people you know? YES
  • showing people your work? YES
  • reading in front of others? NO
  • telling people you are a writer? YES
  • answering the question, “What have you published?” YES
  • answering the question,d “Do you get paid for it?” NO

The number of times you answered yes or no will give you a snapshot of your comfort with “boldness.” It’s not a road map yat–that’s coming in chapter thirteen. But it’s a first step, a personal inventory that you’ll work with.


Work It #11 from A Writer's Guide to Persistence by Jordan Rosenfeld

Work it #11 from A Writer’s Guide to Persistence by Jordan Rosenfeld

Chapter 11: Be Bold, Write Bravely

Okay, it’s time to determine your level of boldness with a set of questions. When you determine what your comfort levels are, you know what “boldness” means to you. Boldness is taking steps outside your comfort zone. You don’t have to take huge, risky steps; you can start with small ones (and we’ll talk more about those in chapter thirteen, “Stretch Your Skills,”), but first we start with identifying your current comfort zone.

Answer the following questions with a yes or no. Are you comfortable…

  • revealing personal feelings in your writing? NO
  • showing your failings or humanity? NO
  • publicly sharing your mistakes? NO
  • using strong language? YES
  • writing about taboo subjects? NO
  • writing about people you know? YES
  • showing people your work? YES
  • reading in front of others? NO
  • telling people you are a writer? YES
  • answering the question, “What have you published?” YES
  • answering the question,d “Do you get paid for it?” NO

The number of times you answered yes or no will give you a snapshot of your comfort with “boldness.” It’s not a road map yat–that’s coming in chapter thirteen. But it’s a first step, a personal inventory that you’ll work with.


Work It #8 from A Writer’s Guide to Persistence by Jordan Rosenfeld

Work It #8 from Chapter 8 “Go Where You Are Welcome”

I highly recommend that you start a “synchronicity” notebook. You may call it whatever you wish: grand coincidences, goals that come to pass…it doesn’t matter how you frame it. Each day, record noteworthy events pertaining to your writing practice and goals. It could be something like “I picked up two books in a row today at the bookstore that shared the same name as my protagonist.” Or “As I was working on an essay about my mother’s death, I had this funny feeling to look through that box of old photos I’ve never opened; there I found a tiny diary she left behind that I never noticed or read before.”

The more you track these events and situations, the stronger your lens will become to look for signs that you’re moving in the right direction, and the more likely you will feel motivated rather than discouraged.

The first thing I’d like to take note of in relation to what Jordan Rosenfeld refers to as synchronicity is that she actually commented on my first post in this blog project series and encouraged me! How cool is that?

Working my way through this book, picking back up and pushing forward, has helped me immensely. Chapter 8, in particular, has helped me make a very difficult decision in my life. I was pursuing a MA in English/Creative Writing, and the program just wasn’t right for me or my writing life. Since I find myself between jobs again, it was also putting undue stress on my personal life, and reading Chapter 8 helped me to center myself long enough to prayerfully consider what I should do, and I have made a decision. I have decided to withdraw from that grad school program. I would rather focus on my marriage, being truly active in my writing life instead of stagnating in a school setting that was making me miserable, and completing my Medical Transcription Editing school by my July 9, 2016 deadline.

I’ve got that tingle. This decision feels like the right decision. I can’t wait to see where this feeling of rightness, this “synchronicity,” which I personally think of as God letting me know that I am on the right path, takes me.


Work It #8 from A Writer's Guide to Persistence by Jordan Rosenfeld

Work It #8 from Chapter 8 “Go Where You Are Welcome”

I highly recommend that you start a “synchronicity” notebook. You may call it whatever you wish: grand coincidences, goals that come to pass…it doesn’t matter how you frame it. Each day, record noteworthy events pertaining to your writing practice and goals. It could be something like “I picked up two books in a row today at the bookstore that shared the same name as my protagonist.” Or “As I was working on an essay about my mother’s death, I had this funny feeling to look through that box of old photos I’ve never opened; there I found a tiny diary she left behind that I never noticed or read before.”

The more you track these events and situations, the stronger your lens will become to look for signs that you’re moving in the right direction, and the more likely you will feel motivated rather than discouraged.

The first thing I’d like to take note of in relation to what Jordan Rosenfeld refers to as synchronicity is that she actually commented on my first post in this blog project series and encouraged me! How cool is that?

Working my way through this book, picking back up and pushing forward, has helped me immensely. Chapter 8, in particular, has helped me make a very difficult decision in my life. I was pursuing a MA in English/Creative Writing, and the program just wasn’t right for me or my writing life. Since I find myself between jobs again, it was also putting undue stress on my personal life, and reading Chapter 8 helped me to center myself long enough to prayerfully consider what I should do, and I have made a decision. I have decided to withdraw from that grad school program. I would rather focus on my marriage, being truly active in my writing life instead of stagnating in a school setting that was making me miserable, and completing my Medical Transcription Editing school by my July 9, 2016 deadline.

I’ve got that tingle. This decision feels like the right decision. I can’t wait to see where this feeling of rightness, this “synchronicity,” which I personally think of as God letting me know that I am on the right path, takes me.


Work It #5 From A Writer’s Guide to Persistence by Jordan Rosenfeld

  1. Buy yourself an erasable whiteboard on which you can write your daily intentions. Don’t keep a long list of all your intentions in an overwhelming list in front of you. (You may have a master list you keep in a notebook, but hide it away.) Every day, erase yesterday’s intentions and copy only intentions from your master list that you can do that day. Try not to overachieve; instead strive to accomplish tasks in manageable chunks. Try to include “writing” on your daily intentions list every day, and remember to start with the most pressing task (anything that is deadline driven or that is driving you crazy) to get it out of the way.

I have the whiteboard, and I need to get my husband to put it beside my desk for me. (I also desperately need to clean off my desk so I once again have a designated writing area that I can actually WORK in. It is currently covered up with files and binders, and they’re piled so high I can’t even set my laptop down on the desk’s surface. I don’t know how I’m going to find time to do anything writing related now that I am working 41.5 hours a week. I am super grateful to have the job that I have now, as opposed to being unemployed, but getting used to the new schedule has thrown my usual poor sheduling abilities right into oblivion. When you add getting my Medical Transcription Editing certification classes and grad school on top of that, there’s hardly time to sleep, much less anything else. I’m hoping that once I get settled into the new schedule, everything will fall into place around it. I could use a little guidance and encouragement in this arena, apparently.)

2. Which of your goals seems more in reach after reading this chapter? Break down this goal into a series of smaller intentions or just the intentions you will set for your next session. What goals do you have that now seem worth pushing off to a later date?

Apparently, I need to reread this chapter! Before I started working (which I am intensely grateful for), finishing Frost on JukePop seemed attainable, but now I just don’t know. I’m hoping that everything will become a little clearer once I’ve gotten used to the new schedule. I welcome advice, input, etc. I was producing at least one chapter a week, but my writing has kind of come to a standstill in light of everything else I have going on (job, MTE school, grad school, trying to help my husband remodel our future home, etc.). I am, however, still 100% ecstatic to have a full-time job that’s making money, and 200% convinced that being married is the best thing ever (because my husband is MADE OF AWESOME and I love him even more than my writing)! So, we’ll see how everything works out. I really hope I can find a way to acclimate and juggle everything without having to drop my writing.


Work It #5 From A Writer's Guide to Persistence by Jordan Rosenfeld

  1. Buy yourself an erasable whiteboard on which you can write your daily intentions. Don’t keep a long list of all your intentions in an overwhelming list in front of you. (You may have a master list you keep in a notebook, but hide it away.) Every day, erase yesterday’s intentions and copy only intentions from your master list that you can do that day. Try not to overachieve; instead strive to accomplish tasks in manageable chunks. Try to include “writing” on your daily intentions list every day, and remember to start with the most pressing task (anything that is deadline driven or that is driving you crazy) to get it out of the way.

I have the whiteboard, and I need to get my husband to put it beside my desk for me. (I also desperately need to clean off my desk so I once again have a designated writing area that I can actually WORK in. It is currently covered up with files and binders, and they’re piled so high I can’t even set my laptop down on the desk’s surface. I don’t know how I’m going to find time to do anything writing related now that I am working 41.5 hours a week. I am super grateful to have the job that I have now, as opposed to being unemployed, but getting used to the new schedule has thrown my usual poor sheduling abilities right into oblivion. When you add getting my Medical Transcription Editing certification classes and grad school on top of that, there’s hardly time to sleep, much less anything else. I’m hoping that once I get settled into the new schedule, everything will fall into place around it. I could use a little guidance and encouragement in this arena, apparently.)

2. Which of your goals seems more in reach after reading this chapter? Break down this goal into a series of smaller intentions or just the intentions you will set for your next session. What goals do you have that now seem worth pushing off to a later date?

Apparently, I need to reread this chapter! Before I started working (which I am intensely grateful for), finishing Frost on JukePop seemed attainable, but now I just don’t know. I’m hoping that everything will become a little clearer once I’ve gotten used to the new schedule. I welcome advice, input, etc. I was producing at least one chapter a week, but my writing has kind of come to a standstill in light of everything else I have going on (job, MTE school, grad school, trying to help my husband remodel our future home, etc.). I am, however, still 100% ecstatic to have a full-time job that’s making money, and 200% convinced that being married is the best thing ever (because my husband is MADE OF AWESOME and I love him even more than my writing)! So, we’ll see how everything works out. I really hope I can find a way to acclimate and juggle everything without having to drop my writing.


Work It #4 from A Writer’s Guide to Persistence by Jordan Rosenfeld

  1. Make a list of all the “possible” time slots in your day that you could devote to writing but aren’t. Or make a list of the distractions you have in place that could be pushed aside to make way for writing. Ignore the voices that say “It’s too hard” or “It won’t happen.” Now look at your list and pick two time slots in which you can write or two distractions you can replace with writing time.

Calendar — Day — 10-7-15 to 10-7-15

2. Select from one of these fantastic apps (list found on p. 38) that don’t allow you to access the Internet within set times or only allow access within certain parameters (such as allowing you to only access certain sites). This will prevent the temptation to go online to peruse your Twitter feed or a friend’s blog when you’ve committed to writing.

I have been using Write Or Die for ages, and I love it.


Work It #4 from A Writer's Guide to Persistence by Jordan Rosenfeld

  1. Make a list of all the “possible” time slots in your day that you could devote to writing but aren’t. Or make a list of the distractions you have in place that could be pushed aside to make way for writing. Ignore the voices that say “It’s too hard” or “It won’t happen.” Now look at your list and pick two time slots in which you can write or two distractions you can replace with writing time.

Calendar — Day — 10-7-15 to 10-7-15

2. Select from one of these fantastic apps (list found on p. 38) that don’t allow you to access the Internet within set times or only allow access within certain parameters (such as allowing you to only access certain sites). This will prevent the temptation to go online to peruse your Twitter feed or a friend’s blog when you’ve committed to writing.

I have been using Write Or Die for ages, and I love it.


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