Tag Archives: work

Honing Your Horror Workshop: Part 2

 


Are You Called To Write?

Have you ever had a thought like this? Man, I’d really love to write a book someday, but I have no idea where to start.

I used to have similar thoughts, but I worked my butt off over the past 11 years, and I’ve been published in Flash Fiction Magazine, Noir Nation No. 3, as well as having self-published A Collection of Reflections (poetry) and Frost: An Otherworld Tale (my debut novel).

If you love a good story, that love is all you need to become a writer. I’ve invested a lifetime of passion and thousands of dollars in learning about writing craft and the publishing industry, and I’d love to share what I’ve learned with those of you who have an inner storyteller begging to get out.

If you’d like to learn more, you can reserve your seat at my upcoming writing workshop dates HERE. The workshops will be held at The Creative Kitchen in my aweome hometown of Bay Minette, Alabama.

Here’s a fun exercise for those of you considering attending the workshop (or anyone who wants to join in, for that matter):

Describe your worst fear in a single paragraph, but there’s a catch; you cannot name your fear in the paragraph. Post your answers in the comments and we’ll try to guess your fear!


Hosting My First Workshop!

I’m SUPER EXCITED to be sharing this news with you all: I’m hosting my first ever writing workshop series at The Creative Kitchen in Bay Minette! I’m also TCK’s new resident writer, so I’ve got a lot to be excited about right now.

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Honing Your Horror is a 3-week Creative Writing Workshop series that meets once a week. This series will meet each Saturday at 11:30 starting Sept. 23rd with its last meeting being Oct 7th. Seats are $60 for the entire workshop ($20/week) with complimentary food & drink being served.

You will meet with me as I lead our group in a series of group exercises and discussions drawn from the many writing craft resources I’ve invested in over the years, as well as my personal experiences in the writing and publishing industry. You will receive personal feedback from me on the pieces you craft in the workshop, as well as positive, constructive critiques from the group as a whole.

TCK’s Lacey Garner had this to say about the workshop: Chelsea wrote within her imagination as a young girl and has made her dream come true through her hard work and determination that has lead to the production of Frost: An Otherworld Tale, a collection of poetry called A Collection of Reflections, as well as many publications within Magazines and Blogs.

By reserving your seat in this workshop, you will learn how to:

  • Tap into your subconscious for good suspense.
  • Draw inspiration from your everyday life and fictionalize it.
  • Paint a compelling story.
  • Shape & mold your phrasing.
  • Decide on your best conclusion.Surround yourself with fellow writers in a like-minded, workshop setting for strong content. Learn from a local published Author as you listen to her advice and gain from her experience. To reserve your seat simply call TCK at 251-753-9210 or book on Eventbrite.

I really hope to see you there, guys!


Rejection – Right in the "Feels"

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Excuse the casual jargon, but rejection definitely hurts. My intuition recently told me that I needed to read the “Be Resilient After Rejection” chapter of A Writer’s Guide to Persistence. My intuition was so right about me needing to read it, too. I used the authors.me platform to submit Frost to an agent a while back, and it got rejected recently. I’ve actually had several projects get shot down recently. There’s no way around it…rejection really sucks.

I loathe rejection. It’s hard as hell for me to deal with. Honestly, it was painful enough that I considered giving up writing altogether. If I’m not making any money off it, I’m just being a burden to my husband. He doesn’t feel that way about it, but I do. It’s a really hard blow to my self-confidence. I went through all the stages of rejection that Jordan Rosenfeld talks about in the “Be Resilient After Rejection” chapter.

I went through the hope-crushing sting. I definitely went though a soul-crushing wave of shame and the following heavy cloud of discouragement. (“I’m never going to be good enough to be published; I should just quit while I’m ahead.”) I am just now attempting to drag myself out of the inaction phase because I dread falling into the inertia phase. I may not be good enough to be published yet, but I will be, someday. I will keep trying.


Rejection – Right in the “Feels”

01099d7a497a3d4659c891998484e980

Excuse the casual jargon, but rejection definitely hurts. My intuition recently told me that I needed to read the “Be Resilient After Rejection” chapter of A Writer’s Guide to Persistence. My intuition was so right about me needing to read it, too. I used the authors.me platform to submit Frost to an agent a while back, and it got rejected recently. I’ve actually had several projects get shot down recently. There’s no way around it…rejection really sucks.

I loathe rejection. It’s hard as hell for me to deal with. Honestly, it was painful enough that I considered giving up writing altogether. If I’m not making any money off it, I’m just being a burden to my husband. He doesn’t feel that way about it, but I do. It’s a really hard blow to my self-confidence. I went through all the stages of rejection that Jordan Rosenfeld talks about in the “Be Resilient After Rejection” chapter.

I went through the hope-crushing sting. I definitely went though a soul-crushing wave of shame and the following heavy cloud of discouragement. (“I’m never going to be good enough to be published; I should just quit while I’m ahead.”) I am just now attempting to drag myself out of the inaction phase because I dread falling into the inertia phase. I may not be good enough to be published yet, but I will be, someday. I will keep trying.


Is Busy Best?

I’ve been doing a little prep for Camp NaNoWriMo the past few days, and by prep I mean reading No Plot? No Problem! by Chris Baty. In it, Baty states that there’s no better time to work on your novel than when you’re already busy. Part of me has a hard time believing that, but that’s probably just because I have ADD and I’m easily overwhelmed due to my personal organization challenges. One thing I can say for myself, however, is that I do seem to do better and work harder when I have impending deadlines hanging over my head.

I’ve got a very busy July ahead of me. So, I guess we’ll see if busy really is better!


Voltaire on Work – Quote of the Day – 9/6/2016

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I can’t even express how many levels this is true on. I’ve been unemployed since January and it’s starting to slowly drive me insane. I feel like such a bum, not contributing anything to my marriage. I’ve been trying to fix Frost: An Otherworld Tale and also trying hard to get back into Jamberry and running that business while I wait to find out if I got the job I applied for back in July. All I’m accomplishing is spinning my wheels, or that’s what it feels like. A real job would make me feel tons better, I know. And the structure also helps me succeed in other areas of my life. It’s difficult for me to heed my calling when I feel like I’m a complete dead weight in my marriage/personal life.


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