Tag Archives: voice

Allen Ginsberg on Voice | Quote of the Day 8/22/17

QOTD 9_1_16(1)


Allen Ginsberg on Voice | Quote of the Day 8/22/17

QOTD 9_1_16(1)


PSA for Readers

Do you love an author who hasn’t hit the bestseller lists yet? Want them to be successful? YOU CAN HELP.

I know you’re sitting in your chair at home, frowning at me, wondering what you can possibly do to help out that author you love. Whether they’re traditionally published or independently published, authors need reviews to survive in this business, much less succeed. If you’re going to take the time to read their work, why not take a couple of minutes to let them know what you thought about it?

Honest, constructive reviews are necessary for authors’ survival these days. Ratings determine your author ranking, and ultimately how many people have the opportunity to discover your book. People who haven’t “hit it big” in the writing business can’t really afford to put ads for their books in front of millions of people the way bigger publishing houses and bestseller list authors can. If they’re anything like me, they can’t afford to pay for ads at all. So, your reviews are extremely important for authors, but especially those who haven’t “hit the big time” yet.

Your voice matters, and you can be the voice that helps amazing new authors get discovered by a broader audience than they could ever hope to reach without you. If you love to read, I implore you to review the books you read because the authors need your voice to be heard for theirs to be heard. Readers completely dictate the writing industry. We do what we do FOR YOU.

So, if you love a new, as yet undiscovered author, please review their work everywhere you possibly can. Tell the industry what you want to see more of. Not only do you get to see more of what you want when you take the time to write reviews, when that undiscovered author you love hits the bestseller list, you can tell everyone around you, “I TOLD YOU SO! I loved them before they were big. Don’t believe me? Check the dates on my reviews. I told the entire world this would how awesome this author is. Nice of the rest of you to catch up with me!”


Work It #3 from A Writer’s Guide to Persistence by Jordan Rosenfeld

  1. When you meet with resistance in your writing or feel uncertain about whether you’re writing something true to you, ask, How am I being vulnerable here? What is another way I can express this authenticity where I may either be heard or gain the skills or connections I need?

  2. Comb through your less-formal writing, the writing now one will see–journals, letters, notes for stories–and highlight phrases that stand out and words you use often. Become familiar with your own lexicon and learn to polish and be proud of it.
  3. Now go through your more formal work: the stories, novels, and essays written with the idea of publication or feedback. Notice recurring themes, happenings, and characters. Do you return often to favorite settings? What scenarios, moods, and tones show up over and over? Make a list and watch your unique voice emerge.

I’m still working on my personal lexicon, but I have noticed that it has a distinctly Southern bent.

My recurring themes revolve around the importance of family, finding a sense of belonging, self-acceptance, and finding true love in unexpected places.

My recurring happenings tend to be weird family shenanigans, exes showing up and temporarily mucking up my romance threads, pets being very important parts of protagonist’s lives, characters simultaneously fighting internal battles as well as external ones, and constant outbursts of humor.

My recurring characters tend to be petite and feisty heroines, highly involved grandparents, big and crazy close families, heroines who are aspiring writers, heroines on accidental journeys of self-discovery, heroines who have jobs they hate and who want something more for their lives, and love interests who are the last thing the heroine ever expected to fall in love with.

The settings I most often return to are small Southern towns based heavily on my hometown of Bay Minette, Alabama.

As I’m building this list, I can absolutely see my unique voice emerging, just as A Writer’s Guide to Persistence said it would.

I can’t wait to see what’s in store for me next!


Work It #3 from A Writer's Guide to Persistence by Jordan Rosenfeld

  1. When you meet with resistance in your writing or feel uncertain about whether you’re writing something true to you, ask, How am I being vulnerable here? What is another way I can express this authenticity where I may either be heard or gain the skills or connections I need?

  2. Comb through your less-formal writing, the writing now one will see–journals, letters, notes for stories–and highlight phrases that stand out and words you use often. Become familiar with your own lexicon and learn to polish and be proud of it.
  3. Now go through your more formal work: the stories, novels, and essays written with the idea of publication or feedback. Notice recurring themes, happenings, and characters. Do you return often to favorite settings? What scenarios, moods, and tones show up over and over? Make a list and watch your unique voice emerge.

I’m still working on my personal lexicon, but I have noticed that it has a distinctly Southern bent.

My recurring themes revolve around the importance of family, finding a sense of belonging, self-acceptance, and finding true love in unexpected places.

My recurring happenings tend to be weird family shenanigans, exes showing up and temporarily mucking up my romance threads, pets being very important parts of protagonist’s lives, characters simultaneously fighting internal battles as well as external ones, and constant outbursts of humor.

My recurring characters tend to be petite and feisty heroines, highly involved grandparents, big and crazy close families, heroines who are aspiring writers, heroines on accidental journeys of self-discovery, heroines who have jobs they hate and who want something more for their lives, and love interests who are the last thing the heroine ever expected to fall in love with.

The settings I most often return to are small Southern towns based heavily on my hometown of Bay Minette, Alabama.

As I’m building this list, I can absolutely see my unique voice emerging, just as A Writer’s Guide to Persistence said it would.

I can’t wait to see what’s in store for me next!


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