Tag Archives: practice

Doctor Pychyl On Procrastination | Quote of the Day 9/7/2017


Doctor Pychyl On Procrastination | Quote of the Day 9/7/2017


Work It #3 from A Writer's Guide to Persistence by Jordan Rosenfeld

  1. When you meet with resistance in your writing or feel uncertain about whether you’re writing something true to you, ask, How am I being vulnerable here? What is another way I can express this authenticity where I may either be heard or gain the skills or connections I need?

  2. Comb through your less-formal writing, the writing now one will see–journals, letters, notes for stories–and highlight phrases that stand out and words you use often. Become familiar with your own lexicon and learn to polish and be proud of it.
  3. Now go through your more formal work: the stories, novels, and essays written with the idea of publication or feedback. Notice recurring themes, happenings, and characters. Do you return often to favorite settings? What scenarios, moods, and tones show up over and over? Make a list and watch your unique voice emerge.

I’m still working on my personal lexicon, but I have noticed that it has a distinctly Southern bent.

My recurring themes revolve around the importance of family, finding a sense of belonging, self-acceptance, and finding true love in unexpected places.

My recurring happenings tend to be weird family shenanigans, exes showing up and temporarily mucking up my romance threads, pets being very important parts of protagonist’s lives, characters simultaneously fighting internal battles as well as external ones, and constant outbursts of humor.

My recurring characters tend to be petite and feisty heroines, highly involved grandparents, big and crazy close families, heroines who are aspiring writers, heroines on accidental journeys of self-discovery, heroines who have jobs they hate and who want something more for their lives, and love interests who are the last thing the heroine ever expected to fall in love with.

The settings I most often return to are small Southern towns based heavily on my hometown of Bay Minette, Alabama.

As I’m building this list, I can absolutely see my unique voice emerging, just as A Writer’s Guide to Persistence said it would.

I can’t wait to see what’s in store for me next!


Work It #3 from A Writer’s Guide to Persistence by Jordan Rosenfeld

  1. When you meet with resistance in your writing or feel uncertain about whether you’re writing something true to you, ask, How am I being vulnerable here? What is another way I can express this authenticity where I may either be heard or gain the skills or connections I need?

  2. Comb through your less-formal writing, the writing now one will see–journals, letters, notes for stories–and highlight phrases that stand out and words you use often. Become familiar with your own lexicon and learn to polish and be proud of it.
  3. Now go through your more formal work: the stories, novels, and essays written with the idea of publication or feedback. Notice recurring themes, happenings, and characters. Do you return often to favorite settings? What scenarios, moods, and tones show up over and over? Make a list and watch your unique voice emerge.

I’m still working on my personal lexicon, but I have noticed that it has a distinctly Southern bent.

My recurring themes revolve around the importance of family, finding a sense of belonging, self-acceptance, and finding true love in unexpected places.

My recurring happenings tend to be weird family shenanigans, exes showing up and temporarily mucking up my romance threads, pets being very important parts of protagonist’s lives, characters simultaneously fighting internal battles as well as external ones, and constant outbursts of humor.

My recurring characters tend to be petite and feisty heroines, highly involved grandparents, big and crazy close families, heroines who are aspiring writers, heroines on accidental journeys of self-discovery, heroines who have jobs they hate and who want something more for their lives, and love interests who are the last thing the heroine ever expected to fall in love with.

The settings I most often return to are small Southern towns based heavily on my hometown of Bay Minette, Alabama.

As I’m building this list, I can absolutely see my unique voice emerging, just as A Writer’s Guide to Persistence said it would.

I can’t wait to see what’s in store for me next!


Working My Way Through The Daily Writer by Fred White

As you may have noticed, I have had issues with persistence, consistency, and upkeep on my blog in the past. So, I am going to make an effort to work through the “Try This” sections. I would like to increase my blog output. So, why not start each writing day by responding to a prompt from The Daily Writer by Fred White?


Work It #2 From A Writer’s Guide to Persistence by Jordan Rosenfeld

“After you’ve completed each of the exercises in this chapter [Chapter 2], you’ll have a rough draft of your Writer’s Code. Now you can create a visual sheet of your Code that you’ll put somewhere handy (perhaps inside a notebook, over your desk, or in a closet you open daily) so you can return to it again and again. Think of it as a contract with yourself that you will renew every six months. As you commit or recommit to your writing journey, any of these details may change.

[NAME’S WRITER’S CODE]

On this day, [date], I state to myself that I write because [list values–as many as you like.]

My best writing rhythms are [at your appointed times of day/night and in your optimal conditions.]

I will take the following risks [your goals/risks here], but will never extend beyond my comfort zone.

When I struggle, I will turn to my Creative Support Team: [names].

When you’re done, print it out, put it up where you can see it, and take it seriously.”

Chelsea Clemmons Moye’s Writer’s Code

On this day, 9/25/2015, I state to myself that I write because I must, it keeps me happy, and it helps keep me sane, among other reasons.

My best writing rhythms are in the afternoon, evening, at night, and occasionally in the wee hours of the morning. My optimal conditions are at my desk or in bed, preferably with Lake (my husband) nearby. I work best with quiet or soft music as background noise.

I will take the following risks:

  1. Try to update Frost once a week.
  2. Blog once a week.
  3. Finish updating Frost’s outline.
  4. Add to BB custom romance framework and send to the client.
  5. Produce at least 500 words a day, five days a week–no matter which project.
  6. Reach out to Custom Romances clients.

Although I plan to take risks, I will never extend beyond my comfort zone.

When I struggle, I will turn to my Creative Support Team: Lake, Mandy, Deb Herbert, Jenn, Shelby, Kylee, Dad, Amberli, and Jess White.

Chelsea C. Moye

This exercise is excerpted from A Writer’s Guide to Persistence by Jordan Rosenfeld. The answers are my own.


Work It #2 From A Writer's Guide to Persistence by Jordan Rosenfeld

“After you’ve completed each of the exercises in this chapter [Chapter 2], you’ll have a rough draft of your Writer’s Code. Now you can create a visual sheet of your Code that you’ll put somewhere handy (perhaps inside a notebook, over your desk, or in a closet you open daily) so you can return to it again and again. Think of it as a contract with yourself that you will renew every six months. As you commit or recommit to your writing journey, any of these details may change.

[NAME’S WRITER’S CODE]

On this day, [date], I state to myself that I write because [list values–as many as you like.]

My best writing rhythms are [at your appointed times of day/night and in your optimal conditions.]

I will take the following risks [your goals/risks here], but will never extend beyond my comfort zone.

When I struggle, I will turn to my Creative Support Team: [names].

When you’re done, print it out, put it up where you can see it, and take it seriously.”

Chelsea Clemmons Moye’s Writer’s Code

On this day, 9/25/2015, I state to myself that I write because I must, it keeps me happy, and it helps keep me sane, among other reasons.

My best writing rhythms are in the afternoon, evening, at night, and occasionally in the wee hours of the morning. My optimal conditions are at my desk or in bed, preferably with Lake (my husband) nearby. I work best with quiet or soft music as background noise.

I will take the following risks:

  1. Try to update Frost once a week.
  2. Blog once a week.
  3. Finish updating Frost’s outline.
  4. Add to BB custom romance framework and send to the client.
  5. Produce at least 500 words a day, five days a week–no matter which project.
  6. Reach out to Custom Romances clients.

Although I plan to take risks, I will never extend beyond my comfort zone.

When I struggle, I will turn to my Creative Support Team: Lake, Mandy, Deb Herbert, Jenn, Shelby, Kylee, Dad, Amberli, and Jess White.

Chelsea C. Moye

This exercise is excerpted from A Writer’s Guide to Persistence by Jordan Rosenfeld. The answers are my own.


Work It #1 from A Writer’s Guide to Persistence by Jordan Rosenfeld

  1. “Why do you write? Have you ever sat down and asked yourself this question?Make a free-form list—that is, don’t stop and think too much about what you’re writing—and write from the gut. No reason is better than another. Write as many reasons as you can until you feel done.”

    Helps me think.
    Keeps me sane.
    It’s calming.
    Creativity is necessary to my existence.
    I love it.
    It’s who I am.
    I don’t know how not to tell stories.
    It’s just what I do.
    I’m miserable when I don’t get time to write.
    It makes me happy.

    “Now ask yourself: What are the top 5 reasons?”
    -It makes me happy.
    -I’m miserable when I don’t get time to write.
    -It keeps me sane.
    -I love it.
    -It is necessary to my existence.

  2. “Compose a second ‘negative’ list. What stands in the way of your writing? What fears, habits, beliefs, or critical voices are trying to drown your desire to write?”I’m afraid I’m not good enough.
    My brain gets exhausted and I get writer’s block.
    I suck at time management.
    My writing inconveniences the people around me.
    I have issues focusing on one project at a time.
    I’m hellishly disorganized.
    I’m not good at standing up for myself and my writing time.
    If somebody asks me to do something else, I set aside my writing to make others happy because I don’t want to be rude.
    I don’t know how to balance my social/personal life with my writing life. So, my writing falls by the wayside because making others happy is deeply important to me. My writing is always the first thing that gets sacrificed.

    “For each item on the negative list, use your top 5 reasons for writing to “cancel out” the negative.”

    I’m afraid I’m not good enough. –> I love it.
    My brain gets exhausted and I get writer’s block. –> It keeps me sane.
    I suck at time management. –> I’m miserable when I don’t get time to write.
    My writing inconveniences the people around me. –> It is necessary to my existence.
    I have issues focusing on one project at a time. –> It makes me happy.
    I’m hellishly disorganized. –> I love it.
    I’m not good at standing up for myself and my writing time. –> It keeps me sane.
    If somebody asks me to do something else, I set aside my writing to make others happy because I don’t want to be rude. –> I’m miserable when I don’t get time to write.
    I don’t know how to balance my social/personal life with my writing life. So, my writing falls by the wayside because making others happy is deeply important to me. My writing is always the first thing that gets sacrificed. –> It is necessary to my existence.

  3. “If you don’t feel like writing at this moment, meditate. Sit quietly with your eyes closed, focus on your breathing, and let the words in this chapter enter you. The goal of this meditation is to make you feel centered, inspired, and ready to write.”

This exercise is excerpted from A Writer’s Guide to Persistence by Jordan Rosenfeld. The answers are my own. I hope you find my answers helpful and inspiring in some way. Once again, I cannot recommend this book enough! I’ll be sharing the second exercise next week, guys!


Work It #1 from A Writer's Guide to Persistence by Jordan Rosenfeld

  1. “Why do you write? Have you ever sat down and asked yourself this question?Make a free-form list—that is, don’t stop and think too much about what you’re writing—and write from the gut. No reason is better than another. Write as many reasons as you can until you feel done.”

    Helps me think.
    Keeps me sane.
    It’s calming.
    Creativity is necessary to my existence.
    I love it.
    It’s who I am.
    I don’t know how not to tell stories.
    It’s just what I do.
    I’m miserable when I don’t get time to write.
    It makes me happy.

    “Now ask yourself: What are the top 5 reasons?”
    -It makes me happy.
    -I’m miserable when I don’t get time to write.
    -It keeps me sane.
    -I love it.
    -It is necessary to my existence.

  2. “Compose a second ‘negative’ list. What stands in the way of your writing? What fears, habits, beliefs, or critical voices are trying to drown your desire to write?”I’m afraid I’m not good enough.
    My brain gets exhausted and I get writer’s block.
    I suck at time management.
    My writing inconveniences the people around me.
    I have issues focusing on one project at a time.
    I’m hellishly disorganized.
    I’m not good at standing up for myself and my writing time.
    If somebody asks me to do something else, I set aside my writing to make others happy because I don’t want to be rude.
    I don’t know how to balance my social/personal life with my writing life. So, my writing falls by the wayside because making others happy is deeply important to me. My writing is always the first thing that gets sacrificed.

    “For each item on the negative list, use your top 5 reasons for writing to “cancel out” the negative.”

    I’m afraid I’m not good enough. –> I love it.
    My brain gets exhausted and I get writer’s block. –> It keeps me sane.
    I suck at time management. –> I’m miserable when I don’t get time to write.
    My writing inconveniences the people around me. –> It is necessary to my existence.
    I have issues focusing on one project at a time. –> It makes me happy.
    I’m hellishly disorganized. –> I love it.
    I’m not good at standing up for myself and my writing time. –> It keeps me sane.
    If somebody asks me to do something else, I set aside my writing to make others happy because I don’t want to be rude. –> I’m miserable when I don’t get time to write.
    I don’t know how to balance my social/personal life with my writing life. So, my writing falls by the wayside because making others happy is deeply important to me. My writing is always the first thing that gets sacrificed. –> It is necessary to my existence.

  3. “If you don’t feel like writing at this moment, meditate. Sit quietly with your eyes closed, focus on your breathing, and let the words in this chapter enter you. The goal of this meditation is to make you feel centered, inspired, and ready to write.”

This exercise is excerpted from A Writer’s Guide to Persistence by Jordan Rosenfeld. The answers are my own. I hope you find my answers helpful and inspiring in some way. Once again, I cannot recommend this book enough! I’ll be sharing the second exercise next week, guys!


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