Tag Archives: personal

Doctor Pychyl On Procrastination | Quote of the Day 9/7/2017


Doctor Pychyl On Procrastination | Quote of the Day 9/7/2017


Surreal

I’m sitting at my desk, staring at a print copy of my first published novel, and it somehow just does not feel real. I’m holding it in my hands, and I keep waiting to wake up and realize that I still haven’t accomplished anything with my writing. Frost is out in the world. People are buying copies, and I’m tracking sales and downloads on a daily basis. For some crazy reason, though, I keep waking up and wondering if this is real, or if I just dreamed it all and I’m still a failure as a writer. I’m not really sure how to shake this feeling of things being surreal.

Will it feel more real when I get my first royalty check? Will it feel more real when I start signing copies for friends and family? Would it feel more real if I had a launch party? Any thoughts or advice are welcome.


What Now?

So, after working on my first novel for the past eleven years, I really don’t know what to do with myself now that I’ve finished the first edition and it’s out in the world. I’m having this vague, restless, listless feeling that I don’t really know how to deal with.

I know I have other things I need to be focusing on right now. I have MTE school to finish. I have a house that is in DESPERATE need of a good top-to-bottom reorganization/cleaning. I guess I’m just confused because I thought being done with this novel would feel like more of a relief than it does. I thought I’d feel more celebratory, more ecstatic. Right now, all I feel is deflated.

Maybe I just need to decompress for a while? I know I need to look at what my goals are for the future, now that I’ve accomplished the biggest goal I had set for 2017. I set out for 2017 to be the year I finally let Frost go, and I’m certain I’ve achieved that. So, what do I do now?

If you’re interested in my personal goals, feel free to check out my personal blogs: We’re the Moyes (A Chronicle of My Adventures With My Wonderful Husband, Lake, As We Try To Adult Without A Manual) and Chelsea Moye (Random Commentary & Observations On My Life).

As for my writing goals for 2017, I’m feeling pretty vague on that point right now. Completing and submitting Frost by the deadline I set for myself knocked out three of the biggest goals I had written down in my “Goals” Notebook. (I keep all different kinds of notebooks and journals for various reasons, and I also recently started doing my own, modified not-so-pretty version of bullet journaling.) The only writing goal I currently have is incredibly vague: I want to publish a romance novel before 2017 ends.

I guess it’s a place to start? Anyway, I’m going to make a concerted effort to blog more consistently across all my blogs as a collective. If there’s a day I don’t post here, check the two personal blogs for posts and vice versa.

I love you guys!


Amazing Announcement

IMG_4201.jpg

That’s right, y’all! Lake and I are expecting a baby! This is the reason I’m a little behind in my blog tour posts, but I’m catching up as of today. Sorry about the delay!


Quote of the Day – 2/29/2016

“Making the work you want to make means finding nourishment within the work itself.” -David Bayles and Ted Orland, from Art & Fear: Observations On the Perils (and Rewards) of Artmaking

I think that this quote is quite relevant to my notion of heeding your calling. The thing that I feel called to do is writing. I gave up on writing for quite some time because I was trapped by the illusion of overnight success. I felt like I was working my butt off for little to no gain. I was failing to appreciate the journey I was on. I deviated from the path I was meant to be on because I had this stupid idea that I ought to be making money RIGHT NOW because I’m a talented writer.

Nothing happens instantaneously. Success does not go hand-in-hand with instant gratification. The need for instant gratification will drown you, your calling, and your innate gifts in a quagmire of frustration, resentment, and it will cause you to give up.

Don’t concern yourself with external pressures. People may say that you shouldn’t consider yourself successful until you’re making money at whatever you’re doing. I disagree. I think that you should only consider yourself successful if whatever you’re doing fulfills you spiritually, emotionally, mentally, and physically. If you don’t walk away from your work feeling a positive charge–a spiritual boost–then you aren’t doing what you’re called to do.

Don’t confuse your calling for a way to make “easy money.” Do what you’re called to do for its intrensic rewards. Do it because you love it, and the rest will come when the time is right.


Work It #15 from A Writer’s Guide to Persistence

Work It #15 from A Writer’s Guide to Persistence by Jordan Rosenfeld

Chapter 15: Consider No Effort Wasted

Brainstorm a list of all the unpaid, unseen, unrewarded hours you’ve invested in projects, people, and writing. These may be things that haven’t “paid off” in your mind. When you’re finished, look objectively at each item on the list. See if you can’t come up with one “gift” each item on that list has given you. Even if the “gift” is something like “It made me realize I never want to do that for a living.” or “I learned to get back up after a fall.” Reward yourself for your hard work with chocolate, a movie, or something that makes you feel good.

  • A Collection of Reflections – The first work I ever self-published. I learned that self-publishing is harder than people think. and that I don’t love writing poetry enough to try to make a living at it.
  • My Blog – My blog has taught me that not everything pays off the minute you start doing it, but if you stick to it, you will eventually start seeing benefits from it. After years of working on this blog with no visible results, I now have tangible proof that it is touching people’s lives and inspiring them.
  • JukePop – It may not be a writing job with a paid advance, but it’s helped me realize I am a talented writer. I know I can reach readers. I have fans who follow me, and my longest-standing project, Frost, has over 4,000 +Votes.

Work It #15 from A Writer's Guide to Persistence

Work It #15 from A Writer’s Guide to Persistence by Jordan Rosenfeld

Chapter 15: Consider No Effort Wasted

Brainstorm a list of all the unpaid, unseen, unrewarded hours you’ve invested in projects, people, and writing. These may be things that haven’t “paid off” in your mind. When you’re finished, look objectively at each item on the list. See if you can’t come up with one “gift” each item on that list has given you. Even if the “gift” is something like “It made me realize I never want to do that for a living.” or “I learned to get back up after a fall.” Reward yourself for your hard work with chocolate, a movie, or something that makes you feel good.

  • A Collection of Reflections – The first work I ever self-published. I learned that self-publishing is harder than people think. and that I don’t love writing poetry enough to try to make a living at it.
  • My Blog – My blog has taught me that not everything pays off the minute you start doing it, but if you stick to it, you will eventually start seeing benefits from it. After years of working on this blog with no visible results, I now have tangible proof that it is touching people’s lives and inspiring them.
  • JukePop – It may not be a writing job with a paid advance, but it’s helped me realize I am a talented writer. I know I can reach readers. I have fans who follow me, and my longest-standing project, Frost, has over 4,000 +Votes.

Quote of the Day – 2/28/16

“Peace I leave with you. My peace I give to you; not as the world gives, give I to you. Don’t let your heart be troubled, neither let it be fearful. -John 14:27

I don’t know all that much about peace, comparatively speaking. I’m prone to embracing chaos far too readily. I’m learning more about peace, though. I know that I feel restless and unfulfilled when I don’t heed my calling to write. Stagnant dissatisfaction sets in. However, when I follow my calling, I feel a sense of peace and advancement, even if what I’m doing is only benefiting me. I feel like everything is good and smooth and bright, like Bay La Launch on a still, warm day, when I heed my calling. When I make time to write, I feel like all is right in the world. I feel like I’m doing what I’m supposed to be doing with my life, and I think that’s what peace is. Everything clicks. Everything feels right.

Look for the things in your life that make you feel that way. Look for that warm, calm hum that waits under the surface and only breaks through when you’re doing the things you’re called to do. I believe that God has a plan for everyone. I believe that God instills feelings of peace in us when we are doing what he’s calling us to do. I believe that when we follow our respective callings, God takes away trouble, turbulence, and fear from our hearts.

When you feel peace, take note of exactly what you’re doing because I guarantee you that it is directly linked to whatever your calling is. My calling is writing. What’s yours?

P.S. Have a blessed Sunday, y’all!


Quote of the Day – 2/27/16

“Nobody’s perfect. We’re all just one step up from the beasts and one step down from the angels.” -Jeannette Walls

You probably noticed that I missed a day. Most of you probably expected it to happen sooner or later. I can hear the bitter grumbles in the back of my mind now.

“Liar. Fraud. You said you were turning over a new leaf. You told me you were committing to writing, at least, one post a day every day, if not two. You let us all down, and you’re a failure. Whoever told you that you have no follow through was right. You will never be a successful writer. You don’t have any real commitment. No wonder you’ve been working on one book for ten years, and you’re still not finished. You know you’re a fraud and a failure. Stop wasting everyone’s time and just give up.”

Okay, so y’all might not be saying those things, but those are the voices I hear in my head after missing a day of writing. I should have posted yesterday, but I got called to substitute teach at the last minute. It was unexpected and the school system I work for has blocked WordPress. I could not access my content editor.

I also had to study for and take a skeletal anatomy unit test. It was challenging and exhausting, but I put in the effort and made 100%. I had an imperfect day and I did my best to work around it. I didn’t get around to my writing for the day and that’s ok. You will occasionally find things that trump your calling, like working toward contributing more to your marriage.

I am human. I make mistakes. I drop the ball. Sometimes my commitment to my writing slips a little. All of these things are ok and they will happen because I’m human. As long as I pick myself up, recommit to my calling, and keep moving forward, slipping for one day isn’t going to destroy the grand scheme of things.


Quote of the Day – 2/24/16

“The only limits to our realizations of tomorrow will be our doubts of today.”
-Franklin D. Roosevelt

Doubt is a trap, and the worst kind of doubt you can fall victim to is self-doubt. As a writer, I know that I have been my own worst enemy on more than one occasion. None of us intend for this to happen, but as a species, we tend to be harder on ourselves than anyone else in the world could be. We have deep, endless wells of faith in others, but when it comes to the self, our wells run dry rather quickly.

Sometimes others trigger our doubts with critical remarks, but you can choose not to allow those doubts to live inside your head. Only you can allow yourself to succumb to doubt. Sure, it would be wonderful to have a broad network of supporters who never doubt you for a second, but even that can’t fix the doubts you have about yourself.

Before anything else, you have to get out your mental weed killer and kill self-doubt in its kudzu-like tracks. Self-doubt breeds the possibility for others to be able to derail you from your calling because you’re helping them rip up the rails! If you want to succeed at anything, you have to get rid of self-doubt and believe that you can do it.

You’re not always going to have others to support you and build you up. If you have faith in yourself, that’s not a problem. But, what happens when you don’t have a support network and you also suffer from self-doubt? What reason do you have to keep pressing on and pursuing your calling? If you’re riddled with self-doubt, it seems like there is no reason for you to keep moving forward. It can be overwhelming, and it can be life-shattering. Self-doubt can stop you from achieving the things you are meant to achieve in life. Self-doubt is the enemy.

As a person who struggles with bouts of depression as a result of Type II Bipolar Disorder, I know just how difficult it can be to overcome self-doubt. I know how powerful an enemy it is because I have allowed myself to be oppressed by self-doubt in the past. I’m going to tell you something that is going to sound a little harsh, but I promise you that it is meant with all the kindness in the world, and it is for your own good.

If you don’t believe in yourself, nobody else is going to do it for you. It is your duty to take care of yourself. It is your duty to do the absolute best you can do for yourself. There will be times in your life when you have no one and no one believes in you (or at least it will feel that way). You are the only one that you can truly rely on to remove doubt from your life.

If you treat yourself well, if you do the absolute best you can for yourself every day, and if you believe in yourself in spite of what the rest of the world may or may not think, a wonderful thing happens! What is that thing? You find true freedom because you’ve created a better situation for yourself. The only opinion of you that ACTUALLY matters in this world is your opinion!  Don’t be afraid to have faith in yourself. Listen to your calling. Pursue the things that make you feel fulfilled and like you are leading the right life for YOU, and I promise everything else will fall into place.

When you take care of yourself, the rest of the world will follow suit. So, practice your calling every day, whether it affects anyone else or not. That is why I write blog posts every single day. I am practicing my calling. I believe that writing more, and writing consistently on a daily basis is making me a better writer, and that will eventually pay off in multitudes of ways. Still, there’s only one way that practicing my calling pays off that REALLY matters, and that payoff is this: I am taking care of myself by practicing my calling on a daily basis.

By taking care of myself I mean respecting myself by being diligently dedicated to my calling, whether or not it affects anyone else. Even if the only way that my writing ever benefits me is that I improve myself through consistency and practice, I still feel fulfilled and happy. The more I respect myself and take care of myself, the less room there is for self-doubt to exist within me. Instead, beautiful things like self-confidence and happiness can grow. The more self-confident and happy you are, the easier it is to follow your calling, and the harder it is for anyone else’s doubts to affect you and pull you off the path of pursuing what you feel called to do.

Heed your calling. Pursue it relentlessly, and leave no room for doubt (from yourself or anyone else). For me, the calling is writing. I write every day, rain or shine, no matter how I’m feeling. Even if I only get two blog posts done and nothing else, I have still practiced my craft and pursued my calling.

Nobody can take the things that you do for yourself in pursuit of your calling away from you unless you let them. Don’t let them!


Quote of the Day – 2/23/16

“Do not just seek happiness for yourself. Seek happiness for all. Through kindness. Through mercy.” -David Levithan

I feel like this is one of the best quotes I have shared for writers, so far. Try not to make your writing practice and your writing life solely about you. Remember that the world does not revolve around you, and it helps to keep that in mind when you’re writing.

Bear in mind that you’re doing something that has the potential to affect others. Why not make sure that the effects of your writing practice are positive and uplifting? Why not help those around you with this gift you have for words. Share faith, happiness, positivity, hope, love, and empathy with others through your writing practice.

Whatever your calling is, even if it’s not writing, always try to use it in a positive way. Seek to make others in the world happy, and you will find your happiness along the way. I honestly believe that everyone in the world has AT LEAST one special gift–at least one thing they are astonishingly good at. My husband, Lake, is a skilled mechanic. My best friends, Tori and Christi, have gifts, too. Tori is a fantastic cook. Christi is a gifted percussionist.

Witnessing them utilizing their gifts is an absolute pleasure for me. I enjoy watching them do what they’re good at, and doing so benefits me, too. I feel emotionally uplifted when I get to witness my husband fixing something or Tori cooking, or Christi making music.

My point is this: your gifts aren’t just for your benefit. Your gifts are meant to be shared with the world around you! Don’t be selfish with your gifts because you never know whose life your gifts may change for the better.


Quote of the Day – 2/22/16

“Peril, loneliness, an uncertain future, are not oppressive evils, so long as the frame is healthy and the faculties are employed; so long, especially, as Liberty lends us her wings, and Hope guides us by her star.” -Charlotte Brontë

As a writer, this quote means that there is always a way to do what you love. No matter how bad your circumstances are, you can always find a way to do the things you love. If something is your true calling, God will open the doors for you to continue following that calling. It won’t always be easy. Life will sometimes weigh heavy on you, and you just have to decide whether or not you feel like pushing through the obstacles and pursuing your dreams.

I promise that if you let Hope and Faith guide you in your calling, you will find fulfillment. It may not be the kind of achievement that touches others and changes their lives right away. There is NO SUCH THING as an overnight success. Not really, anyway. The things that appear to be an overnight success are usually the result of a lifetime of practice and hard work finally paying off.

Take pleasure in the hard work, enjoy the practice. That, in itself, is a beautiful sort of success. Anything else is just a bonus.


Quote of the Day – 2/21/16

“Sing praise to the LORD, you holy ones of His. Give thanks to His holy name. For His anger is but for a moment. His favor is for a lifetime. Weeping may stay for the night, but joy comes in the morning. As for me, I said in my prosperity, ‘I shall never be moved.'” -Psalm 30:4-6 (www.dailybible.co)

You may have noticed that this is the first time my “Quote of the Day” has been a quotation from the Bible. In the past, I have been reluctant to intermingle my career as a writer with my personal faith. I feared that doing so might push some of my potential readers away. I have also had a lifelong struggle with my faith, which I will explain some other time. In any case, I am a Christian, and my faith is a surprisingly integral part of who I am. So, from now on, my “Quote of the Day” each Sunday will be a quote from the Bible, courtesy of the Daily Bible Inspirations app.

I do not claim to have any sort of divine insight regarding this passage, but I can tell you what it means to me, personally, as a writer and Christian. The message I get from this Biblical quote, in regards to my writing practice, is that I should not be easily discouraged. If I keep the faith and remain dedicated to my writing practice, God will bless me with the resolve and imagination I need to continue pursuing my calling as a writer.

I truly believe that if I prayerfully approach my calling as a writer, that God will lead me in the right direction. I believe that God will lead me and my work on the correct path, and open the right doors for me.

In the past, I have struggled with an obsession with what I perceive as fair, and that has often clashed with my faith. I have been fixated on fairness for as long as I can remember. My earliest memories involve me, fraught with indignant outrage over how unfair things often were, socially, at school. Both my grandmothers, women of incredible and unshakeable faith, told me the same thing over and over. “Life isn’t fair, but God is.” Whenever they told me that, it only succeeded in infuriating me even more because I didn’t have the capacity to understand what it meant.

It’s taken me almost 27 years to come to grips with both my faith and my desire to be treated fairly. It has taken me my entire life up until this point–years of lost, frustrated heartache–to finally understand what they meant. It has taken me almost 27 years to finally accept the fact that God knows better than I do what is best for my life. It has taken my whole life for me to finally understand that God’s plan and my plans may not always be one and the same. It has taken me the entirety of my life to understand that God knows better than I do what is best for me, and what path I need to follow to fulfill my life’s purpose.

I believe that’s what has made it so difficult for me to complete Frost in a timely manner. I didn’t want Frost to be Christian fiction because I was afraid it would limit me by excluding non-Christian readers. Frost began as an exploration of my personal struggles with the idea that “Life isn’t fair, but God is,” and that is the way I intend to finish it. If that means that Frost ends up being Christian fiction, then I’m going to stand by it. I feel called to share that struggle. I feel compelled to tell Frost the way it initially struck me.

I have faith that I am now telling the story as God intended me to tell it, and I sincerely hope that this story will still be an irresistibly fantastic adventure when I’m through telling it the way it was supposed to be told.

 


Quote of the Day – 2/20/16

“I call people rich when they’re able to meet the requirements of their imagination.” -Henry James

I feel a sort of kindred spirit in this quote. I have always been drawn to other imaginative, creative types. I feel like having an active, probing imagination holds so much more value than so many people want to believe. Some people mistakenly equate value with profitability, and that can lead to frustration, depression, and worse feelings. Some of the most brilliant writers ever known to mankind only achieve “profit” from their imaginations posthumously.

A lot of people ask me, “Why do you keep writing if it’s made you little to no money so far?”

Well, I believe there is more value in my writing than just profitability. I find value in dedicating myself to what I believe is my true calling. I am looking for ways to discover more about myself in my writing. I am exploring my faith and my beliefs in my writing. I am trying to find ways to better serve God with this gift He gave me. I’ll discuss that more in tomorrow’s post.

I feel like God gave us imaginations so that we can fulfill our potential and glorify Him, and that’s what I’m seeking to do in my future as a writer.

All the best, and may God bless y’all!

xoxo

Chelsea C. Moye


Work It #13 from A Writer's Guide to Persistence by Jordan Rosenfeld

Work It #13 from A Writer’s Guide to Persistence by Jordan Rosenfeld

Chapter 13: Stretch Your Skills

  1. After you’ve strectched, answer each of these questions.
    • What’s your preferred form or genre to write in; i.e., the one you feel most comfortable in? Prose fiction, usually with strong genre influences, if not a clear genre. And my blog…I LOVE my blog.
    • What’s your next favorite? Short stories, but I don’t feel like my short stories have as much meaning or potential as my longer, more complex ideas. 
    • What’s the form or genre you’ve always been curious to experiment with but haven’t yet? Maybe memoir? I’ve always thought it might be cool, but I’ve never really studied memoirs or given any real thought to what I would include in one if I wrote one.
    • Which form or genre seems incredibly different or hard to you? I used to write poetry, but I don’t anymore. I don’t feel like I have the energy for it. If I had to choose a fiction genre that’s particularly hard for me, I’d have to say horror because I have an intense dislike for being frightened. I’m also not very into writing historicals. I love reading them, but I feel like it would require too much research to actually get one published. 

Can you guess where this is going? Give one of these new, scarier forms a try. I recommend you really stretch and go with the fourth entry in your list, but any will do.

2.  Try your hand at a short essay. Write a fictional account of a true event. Turn a bad day into a horror story. Take a warm moment and channel it into a poem. But please pick the one that feels a little bit challenging so you leave your comfort zone.

Oh, boy. I really don’t know what to do or what to pick. I’m instantaneously repulsed by the idea of turning a bad day into a horror story. Maybe I’ll pick that one. It’s just going to be a short fragment of stomething that could be expanded upon later. I’m going to combine writing a fictional account of a true event and turning a bad day into a horror story. 

I’ve had a hell of a day. By 8:00 this morning I was struggling to hold my eyes open, fighting abject exhaustion and trying to focus on what the physical therapist was saying about my husband’s grandmother’s rehabilitation exercises. I know it sounds kind of bad, but the harder I tried to focus, the more I caught myself nodding off after a long, sleepless night. 

Our black and tan coonhounds Bear and Bryant paced, bayed, and howled all night, as if there were a prowler in the yard, but every time we looked, we couldn’t see a damn thing. The dogs finally got quiet some time between 3:45 and 4:15, and then we heard a nerve-shattering crash out in the shop. 

By the time we made it out there, whatever knocked our shelf of tools and racecar parts over was gone. The shelf busted the Lexan back window out of my husband’s ’67 Camaro drag car. It gouged the crimson paint job in a couple places, and left dents in a couple more, and that was a damn bad way to start the day. The Camaro is my husband’s baby.

So, we got two hours of sleep, and he had to go to work, and I had to drag my exhausted ass to Mobile with my mother-in-law and sister-in-law to learn how to properly do rehab for Granny. I tried to push through and stay awake, but my body at 26 just can’t bounce back from lack of sleep like it could when I was 16.

Then I got jarred out of my dozing off by my husband’s ringtone. “Hello?” 

“Babe…I know you’re at the hospital with Granny, but I just wanted to call and let you know that my truck burned to the ground today while I was away at a job site.”

“WHAT?! Oh my GOD! How the hell did that happen?!”

“Cops say it looks like a Malitov cocktail started the blaze. Everything that was in the truck is gone…burned completely up. My granddaddy’s truck, and some sorry excuse for a human being burned it to the ground. I don’t know who’d do something like that, but they better pray I don’t get my hands on their sorry ass is all I can say.”

He may not have known…but I sure did.


Work It #13 from A Writer’s Guide to Persistence by Jordan Rosenfeld

Work It #13 from A Writer’s Guide to Persistence by Jordan Rosenfeld

Chapter 13: Stretch Your Skills

  1. After you’ve strectched, answer each of these questions.
    • What’s your preferred form or genre to write in; i.e., the one you feel most comfortable in? Prose fiction, usually with strong genre influences, if not a clear genre. And my blog…I LOVE my blog.
    • What’s your next favorite? Short stories, but I don’t feel like my short stories have as much meaning or potential as my longer, more complex ideas. 
    • What’s the form or genre you’ve always been curious to experiment with but haven’t yet? Maybe memoir? I’ve always thought it might be cool, but I’ve never really studied memoirs or given any real thought to what I would include in one if I wrote one.
    • Which form or genre seems incredibly different or hard to you? I used to write poetry, but I don’t anymore. I don’t feel like I have the energy for it. If I had to choose a fiction genre that’s particularly hard for me, I’d have to say horror because I have an intense dislike for being frightened. I’m also not very into writing historicals. I love reading them, but I feel like it would require too much research to actually get one published. 

Can you guess where this is going? Give one of these new, scarier forms a try. I recommend you really stretch and go with the fourth entry in your list, but any will do.

2.  Try your hand at a short essay. Write a fictional account of a true event. Turn a bad day into a horror story. Take a warm moment and channel it into a poem. But please pick the one that feels a little bit challenging so you leave your comfort zone.

Oh, boy. I really don’t know what to do or what to pick. I’m instantaneously repulsed by the idea of turning a bad day into a horror story. Maybe I’ll pick that one. It’s just going to be a short fragment of stomething that could be expanded upon later. I’m going to combine writing a fictional account of a true event and turning a bad day into a horror story. 

I’ve had a hell of a day. By 8:00 this morning I was struggling to hold my eyes open, fighting abject exhaustion and trying to focus on what the physical therapist was saying about my husband’s grandmother’s rehabilitation exercises. I know it sounds kind of bad, but the harder I tried to focus, the more I caught myself nodding off after a long, sleepless night. 

Our black and tan coonhounds Bear and Bryant paced, bayed, and howled all night, as if there were a prowler in the yard, but every time we looked, we couldn’t see a damn thing. The dogs finally got quiet some time between 3:45 and 4:15, and then we heard a nerve-shattering crash out in the shop. 

By the time we made it out there, whatever knocked our shelf of tools and racecar parts over was gone. The shelf busted the Lexan back window out of my husband’s ’67 Camaro drag car. It gouged the crimson paint job in a couple places, and left dents in a couple more, and that was a damn bad way to start the day. The Camaro is my husband’s baby.

So, we got two hours of sleep, and he had to go to work, and I had to drag my exhausted ass to Mobile with my mother-in-law and sister-in-law to learn how to properly do rehab for Granny. I tried to push through and stay awake, but my body at 26 just can’t bounce back from lack of sleep like it could when I was 16.

Then I got jarred out of my dozing off by my husband’s ringtone. “Hello?” 

“Babe…I know you’re at the hospital with Granny, but I just wanted to call and let you know that my truck burned to the ground today while I was away at a job site.”

“WHAT?! Oh my GOD! How the hell did that happen?!”

“Cops say it looks like a Malitov cocktail started the blaze. Everything that was in the truck is gone…burned completely up. My granddaddy’s truck, and some sorry excuse for a human being burned it to the ground. I don’t know who’d do something like that, but they better pray I don’t get my hands on their sorry ass is all I can say.”

He may not have known…but I sure did.


Quote of the Day – 2/19/16

“My advice is, never do tomorrow what you can do today. Procrastination is the thief of time.” -Charles Dickens

Ouch! This one stings a bit since I’ve been a procrastinator since before I was born. I’m being entirely literal, people. I was supposed to be a Valentine’s Day baby, and I was born on February 24. I was 10 days late from the very beginning! I can procrastinate with the best of them!

However, if you feel that something is your true calling, I believe that you can make at least a little bit of time each day to do it. As with everything else, it all comes down to priorities. If being a writer is a priority for you, you’ll find a way to do at least a little bit each and every day.

Some people in your life may not understand your priorities. They may not get that–for you–writing is a calling, not a hobby. They may not know that you NEED to write to feel balanced and happy. If this is the case, find something in their life that they feel as strongly about, and present it to them through that paradigm.

“You know how much you love fishing, and how much joy it gives you? You know how you could go every single day, and it would be the best thing ever? That’s how I feel about my writing. Now do you understand why I make it a priority and do it first thing every day? I don’t just like it. It’s not a hobby for me. My writing is my calling. I know that if I follow my calling, God will bless us for it.”

I hope that my mention of God and blessings doesn’t offend you. In the past, I’ve tried to keep my faith and personal beliefs out of my writing, but in doing so, I didn’t feel that I was living up to my true calling. I’ll  be sharing more with you about my spiritual journey and my faith in my post on Sunday.

For now, just remember that if you feel called to write, there’s no need to procrastinate. Do what you feel called to do, make it a priority, and I promise you will find a sense of peace, balance, and fulfillment when you do.


Quote of the Day – 2/17/16

“I hope, or I could not live.” -H.G. Wells

I believe from the bottom of my heart that struggling writers need hope more than they need any other human emotion. What are we without hope? What do we have without hope? Hope is the one emotion that can help a writer keep driving forward in his/her writing life when it seems like everything in the world is stacked against him/her. Hope is the one thing that can keep a writer from giving up, even when she feels that no one believes in her or supports her writing dreams.

Hope is the one thing that keeps me going when I feel like no one understands or supports my dream of becoming a successful writer. Hope is what keeps me going when I feel like no one believes in me. There are days when I think to myself, “Nobody in my whole world thinks I’m going to make it as a writer,” but I keep going because I have hope for myself and my dream of being a successful author. Even if that is true and no one in my life thinks I can do this, I will do everything I can to keep pushing toward my dreams because I have hope.

People in my life have told me so many things over the years, and some them have felt like discouraging attacks, whether they were meant that way or not. However, I have ALWAYS come back to my writing because I love it, I’m passionate about it, and I cling to the hope that I am meant to have a successful writing life. I’ve been told that I’m inconsistent; that I have no follow through; that I may be a good writer, but there are thousands of better writers out there. I’ve been told that I’m the queen of procrastination and never finishing anything. I’ve been told that I don’t have the consistency or persistence to make it in the writing field. All those things may be true statements, but I have hope that my love for writing will help me overcome those problems and succeed in the field that I really love.

Have you noticed anything different lately? I’ve been making, at least, two posts a day, every day for the past month, not counting the Valentine’s Day trip to the beach house that didn’t have the internet. Does that seem inconsistent to you? Does it seem like I still lack follow through? I’m making changes in my life that will make me a better writer, and hopefully a better person too.

I’m making strides toward being more consistent, more persistent, and completing my projects instead of reworking large portions of one project over and over for years on end. I’m doing what I can to make myself a better writer. I’m putting in serious commitment and effort. Who can ask more of me than that?


Work It #11 from A Writer's Guide to Persistence by Jordan Rosenfeld

Work it #11 from A Writer’s Guide to Persistence by Jordan Rosenfeld

Chapter 11: Be Bold, Write Bravely

Okay, it’s time to determine your level of boldness with a set of questions. When you determine what your comfort levels are, you know what “boldness” means to you. Boldness is taking steps outside your comfort zone. You don’t have to take huge, risky steps; you can start with small ones (and we’ll talk more about those in chapter thirteen, “Stretch Your Skills,”), but first we start with identifying your current comfort zone.

Answer the following questions with a yes or no. Are you comfortable…

  • revealing personal feelings in your writing? NO
  • showing your failings or humanity? NO
  • publicly sharing your mistakes? NO
  • using strong language? YES
  • writing about taboo subjects? NO
  • writing about people you know? YES
  • showing people your work? YES
  • reading in front of others? NO
  • telling people you are a writer? YES
  • answering the question, “What have you published?” YES
  • answering the question,d “Do you get paid for it?” NO

The number of times you answered yes or no will give you a snapshot of your comfort with “boldness.” It’s not a road map yat–that’s coming in chapter thirteen. But it’s a first step, a personal inventory that you’ll work with.


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