Tag Archives: exercise

Are You Called To Write?

Have you ever had a thought like this? Man, I’d really love to write a book someday, but I have no idea where to start.

I used to have similar thoughts, but I worked my butt off over the past 11 years, and I’ve been published in Flash Fiction Magazine, Noir Nation No. 3, as well as having self-published A Collection of Reflections (poetry) and Frost: An Otherworld Tale (my debut novel).

If you love a good story, that love is all you need to become a writer. I’ve invested a lifetime of passion and thousands of dollars in learning about writing craft and the publishing industry, and I’d love to share what I’ve learned with those of you who have an inner storyteller begging to get out.

If you’d like to learn more, you can reserve your seat at my upcoming writing workshop dates HERE. The workshops will be held at The Creative Kitchen in my aweome hometown of Bay Minette, Alabama.

Here’s a fun exercise for those of you considering attending the workshop (or anyone who wants to join in, for that matter):

Describe your worst fear in a single paragraph, but there’s a catch; you cannot name your fear in the paragraph. Post your answers in the comments and we’ll try to guess your fear!


Work It #2 From A Writer's Guide to Persistence by Jordan Rosenfeld

“After you’ve completed each of the exercises in this chapter [Chapter 2], you’ll have a rough draft of your Writer’s Code. Now you can create a visual sheet of your Code that you’ll put somewhere handy (perhaps inside a notebook, over your desk, or in a closet you open daily) so you can return to it again and again. Think of it as a contract with yourself that you will renew every six months. As you commit or recommit to your writing journey, any of these details may change.

[NAME’S WRITER’S CODE]

On this day, [date], I state to myself that I write because [list values–as many as you like.]

My best writing rhythms are [at your appointed times of day/night and in your optimal conditions.]

I will take the following risks [your goals/risks here], but will never extend beyond my comfort zone.

When I struggle, I will turn to my Creative Support Team: [names].

When you’re done, print it out, put it up where you can see it, and take it seriously.”

Chelsea Clemmons Moye’s Writer’s Code

On this day, 9/25/2015, I state to myself that I write because I must, it keeps me happy, and it helps keep me sane, among other reasons.

My best writing rhythms are in the afternoon, evening, at night, and occasionally in the wee hours of the morning. My optimal conditions are at my desk or in bed, preferably with Lake (my husband) nearby. I work best with quiet or soft music as background noise.

I will take the following risks:

  1. Try to update Frost once a week.
  2. Blog once a week.
  3. Finish updating Frost’s outline.
  4. Add to BB custom romance framework and send to the client.
  5. Produce at least 500 words a day, five days a week–no matter which project.
  6. Reach out to Custom Romances clients.

Although I plan to take risks, I will never extend beyond my comfort zone.

When I struggle, I will turn to my Creative Support Team: Lake, Mandy, Deb Herbert, Jenn, Shelby, Kylee, Dad, Amberli, and Jess White.

Chelsea C. Moye

This exercise is excerpted from A Writer’s Guide to Persistence by Jordan Rosenfeld. The answers are my own.


Work It #2 From A Writer’s Guide to Persistence by Jordan Rosenfeld

“After you’ve completed each of the exercises in this chapter [Chapter 2], you’ll have a rough draft of your Writer’s Code. Now you can create a visual sheet of your Code that you’ll put somewhere handy (perhaps inside a notebook, over your desk, or in a closet you open daily) so you can return to it again and again. Think of it as a contract with yourself that you will renew every six months. As you commit or recommit to your writing journey, any of these details may change.

[NAME’S WRITER’S CODE]

On this day, [date], I state to myself that I write because [list values–as many as you like.]

My best writing rhythms are [at your appointed times of day/night and in your optimal conditions.]

I will take the following risks [your goals/risks here], but will never extend beyond my comfort zone.

When I struggle, I will turn to my Creative Support Team: [names].

When you’re done, print it out, put it up where you can see it, and take it seriously.”

Chelsea Clemmons Moye’s Writer’s Code

On this day, 9/25/2015, I state to myself that I write because I must, it keeps me happy, and it helps keep me sane, among other reasons.

My best writing rhythms are in the afternoon, evening, at night, and occasionally in the wee hours of the morning. My optimal conditions are at my desk or in bed, preferably with Lake (my husband) nearby. I work best with quiet or soft music as background noise.

I will take the following risks:

  1. Try to update Frost once a week.
  2. Blog once a week.
  3. Finish updating Frost’s outline.
  4. Add to BB custom romance framework and send to the client.
  5. Produce at least 500 words a day, five days a week–no matter which project.
  6. Reach out to Custom Romances clients.

Although I plan to take risks, I will never extend beyond my comfort zone.

When I struggle, I will turn to my Creative Support Team: Lake, Mandy, Deb Herbert, Jenn, Shelby, Kylee, Dad, Amberli, and Jess White.

Chelsea C. Moye

This exercise is excerpted from A Writer’s Guide to Persistence by Jordan Rosenfeld. The answers are my own.


Random Story Idea 1/26/2015

A well-respected young woman from an upstanding family fakes her death to get out from under a massive amount of debt & her controlling fiancée. She moves across the country and starts a new life, but it’s not everything she expected. She ends up broke & has two options: come out of hiding, which will show her family and former fiancée that she is not, in fact, dead (and they paid off her debts to their own detriment), or turn to a means of income generation she would never otherwise have considered.


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