Tag Archives: Combat Criticism

Work It #16 from A Writer’s Guide to Persistence by Jordan Rosenfeld

Pick a recent criticism you’ve received. Write a rant. Really go for it. No one ever needs to see this, so there’s no need for censorship of careful language. Let it out. Rip the page with your pen. Bleed your pain dry.

Next be your own kind mentor, receiving the rant. Write a gentle letter back to your ranting self, offering support or encouragement.

Then, if you’ve received a recent critique that left you feeling raw, after geting some necessary distance, try to look at it objectively. Identify whether the critique is asking for something you just can’t deliver or whether it simply touches upon a feeling inside you, such as disappointment because you thought you were finished. Read the critique as if it were written to someone else. Can you find a point or a place of agreement? See if you can’t take just one small piece of the feedback and run with it.

Okay, so I’m obviously not going to share these things with y’all because it’s just too personal. I think the point of this exercise is to work out some personal kinks. Just know that I’m applying this Work It exercise to some critiques I’ve received for Frost over the years (some of them I even got in college when this project was in a much earlier iteration). I’m hoping that it will be an exercise in healing and improvement for me.


Work It #16 from A Writer's Guide to Persistence by Jordan Rosenfeld

Pick a recent criticism you’ve received. Write a rant. Really go for it. No one ever needs to see this, so there’s no need for censorship of careful language. Let it out. Rip the page with your pen. Bleed your pain dry.

Next be your own kind mentor, receiving the rant. Write a gentle letter back to your ranting self, offering support or encouragement.

Then, if you’ve received a recent critique that left you feeling raw, after geting some necessary distance, try to look at it objectively. Identify whether the critique is asking for something you just can’t deliver or whether it simply touches upon a feeling inside you, such as disappointment because you thought you were finished. Read the critique as if it were written to someone else. Can you find a point or a place of agreement? See if you can’t take just one small piece of the feedback and run with it.

Okay, so I’m obviously not going to share these things with y’all because it’s just too personal. I think the point of this exercise is to work out some personal kinks. Just know that I’m applying this Work It exercise to some critiques I’ve received for Frost over the years (some of them I even got in college when this project was in a much earlier iteration). I’m hoping that it will be an exercise in healing and improvement for me.


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