Tag Archives: blogger

William S. Burroughs on Quality | Quote of the Day 8/23/17

QOTD 8_23_17


William S. Burroughs on Quality | Quote of the Day 8/23/17

QOTD 8_23_17


Allen Ginsberg on Voice | Quote of the Day 8/22/17

QOTD 9_1_16(1)


Allen Ginsberg on Voice | Quote of the Day 8/22/17

QOTD 9_1_16(1)


PSA for Readers

Do you love an author who hasn’t hit the bestseller lists yet? Want them to be successful? YOU CAN HELP.

I know you’re sitting in your chair at home, frowning at me, wondering what you can possibly do to help out that author you love. Whether they’re traditionally published or independently published, authors need reviews to survive in this business, much less succeed. If you’re going to take the time to read their work, why not take a couple of minutes to let them know what you thought about it?

Honest, constructive reviews are necessary for authors’ survival these days. Ratings determine your author ranking, and ultimately how many people have the opportunity to discover your book. People who haven’t “hit it big” in the writing business can’t really afford to put ads for their books in front of millions of people the way bigger publishing houses and bestseller list authors can. If they’re anything like me, they can’t afford to pay for ads at all. So, your reviews are extremely important for authors, but especially those who haven’t “hit the big time” yet.

Your voice matters, and you can be the voice that helps amazing new authors get discovered by a broader audience than they could ever hope to reach without you. If you love to read, I implore you to review the books you read because the authors need your voice to be heard for theirs to be heard. Readers completely dictate the writing industry. We do what we do FOR YOU.

So, if you love a new, as yet undiscovered author, please review their work everywhere you possibly can. Tell the industry what you want to see more of. Not only do you get to see more of what you want when you take the time to write reviews, when that undiscovered author you love hits the bestseller list, you can tell everyone around you, “I TOLD YOU SO! I loved them before they were big. Don’t believe me? Check the dates on my reviews. I told the entire world this would how awesome this author is. Nice of the rest of you to catch up with me!”


Rejection – Right in the "Feels"

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Excuse the casual jargon, but rejection definitely hurts. My intuition recently told me that I needed to read the “Be Resilient After Rejection” chapter of A Writer’s Guide to Persistence. My intuition was so right about me needing to read it, too. I used the authors.me platform to submit Frost to an agent a while back, and it got rejected recently. I’ve actually had several projects get shot down recently. There’s no way around it…rejection really sucks.

I loathe rejection. It’s hard as hell for me to deal with. Honestly, it was painful enough that I considered giving up writing altogether. If I’m not making any money off it, I’m just being a burden to my husband. He doesn’t feel that way about it, but I do. It’s a really hard blow to my self-confidence. I went through all the stages of rejection that Jordan Rosenfeld talks about in the “Be Resilient After Rejection” chapter.

I went through the hope-crushing sting. I definitely went though a soul-crushing wave of shame and the following heavy cloud of discouragement. (“I’m never going to be good enough to be published; I should just quit while I’m ahead.”) I am just now attempting to drag myself out of the inaction phase because I dread falling into the inertia phase. I may not be good enough to be published yet, but I will be, someday. I will keep trying.


Rejection – Right in the “Feels”

01099d7a497a3d4659c891998484e980

Excuse the casual jargon, but rejection definitely hurts. My intuition recently told me that I needed to read the “Be Resilient After Rejection” chapter of A Writer’s Guide to Persistence. My intuition was so right about me needing to read it, too. I used the authors.me platform to submit Frost to an agent a while back, and it got rejected recently. I’ve actually had several projects get shot down recently. There’s no way around it…rejection really sucks.

I loathe rejection. It’s hard as hell for me to deal with. Honestly, it was painful enough that I considered giving up writing altogether. If I’m not making any money off it, I’m just being a burden to my husband. He doesn’t feel that way about it, but I do. It’s a really hard blow to my self-confidence. I went through all the stages of rejection that Jordan Rosenfeld talks about in the “Be Resilient After Rejection” chapter.

I went through the hope-crushing sting. I definitely went though a soul-crushing wave of shame and the following heavy cloud of discouragement. (“I’m never going to be good enough to be published; I should just quit while I’m ahead.”) I am just now attempting to drag myself out of the inaction phase because I dread falling into the inertia phase. I may not be good enough to be published yet, but I will be, someday. I will keep trying.


Is Busy Best?

I’ve been doing a little prep for Camp NaNoWriMo the past few days, and by prep I mean reading No Plot? No Problem! by Chris Baty. In it, Baty states that there’s no better time to work on your novel than when you’re already busy. Part of me has a hard time believing that, but that’s probably just because I have ADD and I’m easily overwhelmed due to my personal organization challenges. One thing I can say for myself, however, is that I do seem to do better and work harder when I have impending deadlines hanging over my head.

I’ve got a very busy July ahead of me. So, I guess we’ll see if busy really is better!


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