Tag Archives: accountability

NaNoWriMo 2017 | Day 1

You can check out one of my favorite NaNoWriMo tools from Writer’s Digest at the link below!

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Getting Ready for NaNoWriMo 2017

That’s right, I’m doing it again. National Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo for short) is right around the corner, and I’ve committed to doing it again this year. I’m taking a short break from my Otherworld Trilogy to start my Murphy Family Mysteries series. So, what book am I doing this year?

Murphy'sLaw of theJungle

This will be the first of many mysteries for the zany but endearing Murphy family. I’m not letting myself do a whole lot of over-planning for this one. I’m trying to short-circuit my perfectionist tendencies that usually make me bog down in my writing. This year, I intend to make steady progress and have an extremely rough draft to work from by November 30.

What tools do I have in my arsenal for this November? Here’s a short list:

  • LOTS OF COFFEE
  • A Basic Idea of Where the Story Is Going
  • The 5KWPH App/Technique Developed by Chris Fox
  • My Bullet Journal/Planner
  • Pens
  • Papers
  • Notebooks
  • Supportive Family & Friends Who Will Hold Me Accountable Via Our Facebook Group
  • My Awesome Word Count Widget In the Sidebar of My Blog! →
  • My Fantastic Blogging Community
  • Some New ADHD Management Techniques I Learned from Overcoming Distractions by David A. Greenwood
  • My Amazing Friend Lacey At The Creative Kitchen & Her YouTube Channel (Daily Check-Ins Are Totally Going to Happen)
  • My Trusty, Well-Worn Copy of A Writer’s Guide to Persistence
  • Did I mention COFFEE?

Well, that’s about all I have for you guys right now! 🙂 Stay tuned for all the NaNoWriMo shenanigans!

For Excellent Writing Resources, Check Out WritersDigestShop.com!


Doctor Pychyl On Procrastination | Quote of the Day 9/7/2017


Doctor Pychyl On Procrastination | Quote of the Day 9/7/2017


Work It #4 from A Writer's Guide to Persistence by Jordan Rosenfeld

  1. Make a list of all the “possible” time slots in your day that you could devote to writing but aren’t. Or make a list of the distractions you have in place that could be pushed aside to make way for writing. Ignore the voices that say “It’s too hard” or “It won’t happen.” Now look at your list and pick two time slots in which you can write or two distractions you can replace with writing time.

Calendar — Day — 10-7-15 to 10-7-15

2. Select from one of these fantastic apps (list found on p. 38) that don’t allow you to access the Internet within set times or only allow access within certain parameters (such as allowing you to only access certain sites). This will prevent the temptation to go online to peruse your Twitter feed or a friend’s blog when you’ve committed to writing.

I have been using Write Or Die for ages, and I love it.


Work It #4 from A Writer’s Guide to Persistence by Jordan Rosenfeld

  1. Make a list of all the “possible” time slots in your day that you could devote to writing but aren’t. Or make a list of the distractions you have in place that could be pushed aside to make way for writing. Ignore the voices that say “It’s too hard” or “It won’t happen.” Now look at your list and pick two time slots in which you can write or two distractions you can replace with writing time.

Calendar — Day — 10-7-15 to 10-7-15

2. Select from one of these fantastic apps (list found on p. 38) that don’t allow you to access the Internet within set times or only allow access within certain parameters (such as allowing you to only access certain sites). This will prevent the temptation to go online to peruse your Twitter feed or a friend’s blog when you’ve committed to writing.

I have been using Write Or Die for ages, and I love it.


Work It #3 from A Writer’s Guide to Persistence by Jordan Rosenfeld

  1. When you meet with resistance in your writing or feel uncertain about whether you’re writing something true to you, ask, How am I being vulnerable here? What is another way I can express this authenticity where I may either be heard or gain the skills or connections I need?

  2. Comb through your less-formal writing, the writing now one will see–journals, letters, notes for stories–and highlight phrases that stand out and words you use often. Become familiar with your own lexicon and learn to polish and be proud of it.
  3. Now go through your more formal work: the stories, novels, and essays written with the idea of publication or feedback. Notice recurring themes, happenings, and characters. Do you return often to favorite settings? What scenarios, moods, and tones show up over and over? Make a list and watch your unique voice emerge.

I’m still working on my personal lexicon, but I have noticed that it has a distinctly Southern bent.

My recurring themes revolve around the importance of family, finding a sense of belonging, self-acceptance, and finding true love in unexpected places.

My recurring happenings tend to be weird family shenanigans, exes showing up and temporarily mucking up my romance threads, pets being very important parts of protagonist’s lives, characters simultaneously fighting internal battles as well as external ones, and constant outbursts of humor.

My recurring characters tend to be petite and feisty heroines, highly involved grandparents, big and crazy close families, heroines who are aspiring writers, heroines on accidental journeys of self-discovery, heroines who have jobs they hate and who want something more for their lives, and love interests who are the last thing the heroine ever expected to fall in love with.

The settings I most often return to are small Southern towns based heavily on my hometown of Bay Minette, Alabama.

As I’m building this list, I can absolutely see my unique voice emerging, just as A Writer’s Guide to Persistence said it would.

I can’t wait to see what’s in store for me next!


Work It #3 from A Writer's Guide to Persistence by Jordan Rosenfeld

  1. When you meet with resistance in your writing or feel uncertain about whether you’re writing something true to you, ask, How am I being vulnerable here? What is another way I can express this authenticity where I may either be heard or gain the skills or connections I need?

  2. Comb through your less-formal writing, the writing now one will see–journals, letters, notes for stories–and highlight phrases that stand out and words you use often. Become familiar with your own lexicon and learn to polish and be proud of it.
  3. Now go through your more formal work: the stories, novels, and essays written with the idea of publication or feedback. Notice recurring themes, happenings, and characters. Do you return often to favorite settings? What scenarios, moods, and tones show up over and over? Make a list and watch your unique voice emerge.

I’m still working on my personal lexicon, but I have noticed that it has a distinctly Southern bent.

My recurring themes revolve around the importance of family, finding a sense of belonging, self-acceptance, and finding true love in unexpected places.

My recurring happenings tend to be weird family shenanigans, exes showing up and temporarily mucking up my romance threads, pets being very important parts of protagonist’s lives, characters simultaneously fighting internal battles as well as external ones, and constant outbursts of humor.

My recurring characters tend to be petite and feisty heroines, highly involved grandparents, big and crazy close families, heroines who are aspiring writers, heroines on accidental journeys of self-discovery, heroines who have jobs they hate and who want something more for their lives, and love interests who are the last thing the heroine ever expected to fall in love with.

The settings I most often return to are small Southern towns based heavily on my hometown of Bay Minette, Alabama.

As I’m building this list, I can absolutely see my unique voice emerging, just as A Writer’s Guide to Persistence said it would.

I can’t wait to see what’s in store for me next!


False Start – The Daily Writer

You may have noticed that I didn’t get started with my responses to the exercises in The Daily Writer by Fred White yet. Why? My husband’s grandmother fell and broke her femur on Thursday, and I dropped the ball on my writing to take care of family business. Family is more important, and always comes first for me. I will start the exercises when we reach a state of equilibrium again.

I feel like a lot of the events that have taken place in my life this year have been opportunities for me to drop the ball on one thing or another. One of my problems is that I’m very much the “all-or-nothing” type of ADD individual. I haven’t just dropped the ball on one thing, I’ve dropped the ball on EVERYTHING for the past few months. I am terrible at finding and/or maintaining balance in my life. I know I need it, but I’m just not sure how to get there. I could use a little help trying to balance things.

In the past, I’ve been known to go through cycles of dropping everything in my life to focus on my writing and periods of completely sacrificing my writing to focus on the rest of my life. There has to be a middle ground, and I could use some help getting there.

I’m happily married to the love of my life now and dropping everything to focus on my writing is no longer feasible or possible. I could really use some advice on how to balance my personal life, my scholarly life, and my writing life. I’m sure it’s obvious that time management is not my strong suit.

Can someone please help me figure out how to juggle everything without being a hermit, and still find time to get sleep in the process? Any and all advice is welcome.


Daily Writing Is Happening!

Even though I haven’t been posting on here every day (like I should), I have been writing for at least five minutes a day. I’m doing a lot of roughing things out with a pen and notebook. Things just seem to be flowing better with ink and paper, as of late. Even with everything that’s going on in my personal life (both fantastic and bad), I’m managing to get things done in my writing life.

I’m working hard to merge Frost back on the track I laid out for it in my original outline. I set my outline aside for a little while and wandered a little farther away from it than I intended. There are things I like about the old outline and things I like about where the creative flow took me. Now I’m just working on making a cohesive marriage of the two, and trying to see how that’s going to change the remaining 31 scenes I had originally planned for the book. I plan on finishing the free version on JukePop by the end of the summer so I can get it edited and release some time this winter.

After I get the next scene written for Frost, I’m going to work on the next chapter of The Alexandria Chronicles, then Murphy’s Law of the Jungle. Frost is still my number one priority, though. Once the edited and expanded version of Frost has been released, I intend to focus primarily on finishing Murphy’s Law of the Jungle. I’d like to have that story wrapped up by the end of next summer. If all goes well with Frost, I am likely to try to publish an edited and expanded edition of Murphy’s Law of the Jungle through JukePop.

What about that awesome space opera I’m working on called The Alexandria Chronicles, you ask? I will continue adding chapters to it when I’m taking breaks from my primary projects!

As for personal things going on in my life, it’s now a mixed bag. My grandmother is going on 93 and her health is deteriorating swiftly. She is the only living grandparent I have left. I know she’s had a lot of good years and is leaving us with an incredible legacy, but it’s still a very painful thing to deal with. On the bright side, however, my fiancĂ© got to meet her and she congratulated us on our impending nuptials. This brings me back to the original reason I started this post: daily posts are not my strong suit, and I can guarantee you that my updates will be scattered and/or infrequent between now and the wedding.

I’m hoping that I’ll be able to really and truly settle into the habit of posting on here daily some time in August or September. I feel that, as a writer, I need the responsibility and  accountability that posting on a daily basis brings. In the past, my creativity has been a bit spastic and dictated by my rather fickle muse. I’m glad to state that the muse and I recently had a come to Jesus meeting, and she’s being much more cooperative now that I’m only demanding 5 minutes a day from her, as opposed to me trying to write a novel in 3 days during a manic fit riddled with very little sleep and too much coffee.


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