Category Archives: Personal

Hosting My First Workshop!

I’m SUPER EXCITED to be sharing this news with you all: I’m hosting my first ever writing workshop series at The Creative Kitchen in Bay Minette! I’m also TCK’s new resident writer, so I’ve got a lot to be excited about right now.

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Honing Your Horror is a 3-week Creative Writing Workshop series that meets once a week. This series will meet each Saturday at 11:30 starting Sept. 23rd with its last meeting being Oct 7th. Seats are $60 for the entire workshop ($20/week) with complimentary food & drink being served.

You will meet with me as I lead our group in a series of group exercises and discussions drawn from the many writing craft resources I’ve invested in over the years, as well as my personal experiences in the writing and publishing industry. You will receive personal feedback from me on the pieces you craft in the workshop, as well as positive, constructive critiques from the group as a whole.

TCK’s Lacey Garner had this to say about the workshop: Chelsea wrote within her imagination as a young girl and has made her dream come true through her hard work and determination that has lead to the production of Frost: An Otherworld Tale, a collection of poetry called A Collection of Reflections, as well as many publications within Magazines and Blogs.

By reserving your seat in this workshop, you will learn how to:

  • Tap into your subconscious for good suspense.
  • Draw inspiration from your everyday life and fictionalize it.
  • Paint a compelling story.
  • Shape & mold your phrasing.
  • Decide on your best conclusion.Surround yourself with fellow writers in a like-minded, workshop setting for strong content. Learn from a local published Author as you listen to her advice and gain from her experience. To reserve your seat simply call TCK at 251-753-9210 or book on Eventbrite.

I really hope to see you there, guys!


Doctor Pychyl On Procrastination | Quote of the Day 9/7/2017


Doctor Pychyl On Procrastination | Quote of the Day 9/7/2017


Is Busy Best?

I’ve been doing a little prep for Camp NaNoWriMo the past few days, and by prep I mean reading No Plot? No Problem! by Chris Baty. In it, Baty states that there’s no better time to work on your novel than when you’re already busy. Part of me has a hard time believing that, but that’s probably just because I have ADD and I’m easily overwhelmed due to my personal organization challenges. One thing I can say for myself, however, is that I do seem to do better and work harder when I have impending deadlines hanging over my head.

I’ve got a very busy July ahead of me. So, I guess we’ll see if busy really is better!


Struggling

I really wanted to post something insightful and relevant today, but I’m having such a hard time focusing right now that it doesn’t look like that’s going to happen. Why am I struggling so hard to focus and find something good to share here? Is it the general and hormonal discomforts of the third trimester? Is it my current project that I can’t tell you about because I’m going to publish it under a pen name? Is it sheer exhaustion?

I honestly don’t know what my problem is right now. Sigh. Maybe I’ll just go do some work on the project that hath no name.


Tweaking My Process

As a writer, I’ve struggled with my personal process for quite some time now. Those who know me well enough to be privy to my process can attest to the fact that I have plagued by perfectionism and over-planning for my entire writing career up to this point.

So, since I’ve been working on streamlining and minimizing in my home life, I decided to go for it in my writing life, too! It’s simultaneously freeing and terrifying, but I think it’s going to make me a much more productive and effective writer once I implement everything I intend to.

Depending on how well you know me and/or how long you’ve been following my blog, you may know that it took me almost 12 years to plan and execute Frost. Why? I’ll be honest with you, it had a lot to do with over-planning, perfectionism, and major story changes that took a long time to implement. Instead of just going with my gut and using only the tools I needed to plan and execute my story, I put it through every possible planning process I could get my hands on. In short, I did a lot of unnecessary work on the front end that kept me from really getting down to my writing.

If I’m being honest, the only way I finished the novel was that I ended up locking myself into a deadline I couldn’t avoid, and I had to get the actual writing done by then. Sure, my novel came out with some imperfections as a result of that, but I finally FINISHED it. I can’t even tell you what a relief it was to finally let go and move on. So, I’m taking a new approach to my writing life. I’m doing only what I absolutely need to planning-wise to get a solid overview of my story before I start writing.

I planned a 16-chapter romance novel with two scenes per chapter in the space of a single day, and very few people will realize what a feat that was for me. When I finish writing it, I plan on submitting it to a traditional publisher of romance, but I will probably be publishing it under a pen name. Why? I feel like publishing it under another name that people don’t associate with me can open me up to more of a creative flow, and make it easier for me to work without the fear of poor judgment from others.

So, to sum up the entire point of this post, I’m just celebrating the fact that I’ve finally learned to take only what I need from all the writing guides I’ve got. To top that off, I’m making the process work for me, thus significantly speeding up turnaround on my work!

*throws celebratory confetti and pats self on back*


Surreal

I’m sitting at my desk, staring at a print copy of my first published novel, and it somehow just does not feel real. I’m holding it in my hands, and I keep waiting to wake up and realize that I still haven’t accomplished anything with my writing. Frost is out in the world. People are buying copies, and I’m tracking sales and downloads on a daily basis. For some crazy reason, though, I keep waking up and wondering if this is real, or if I just dreamed it all and I’m still a failure as a writer. I’m not really sure how to shake this feeling of things being surreal.

Will it feel more real when I get my first royalty check? Will it feel more real when I start signing copies for friends and family? Would it feel more real if I had a launch party? Any thoughts or advice are welcome.


Is Resistance Futile?

I tend to obsess about things pretty regularly. I fixate, and when I do I fixate HARD. Right now, I’m trying to resist the urge to check my sales stats for Frost. Should I be resisting? Probably so. If I don’t resist the compulsion to constantly check for updates, I’m probably going to end up driving myself insane.

How could I drive myself insane with that information? There’s the list, as it currently stands.

  • I’m not doing an official book launch right now, so I can’t expect the sales to be spectacular in the first place.
  • I’m not doing any official marketing at the moment, which also won’t help my sales.
  • Professional envy. I’m not going to lie, I’ve got it bad, but it’s something I’m working on because I know that comparison breeds misery. Better to work on staying in my own lane and keeping positive.
  • I’m already too impatient, and checking sales compulsively only makes me more impatient.

I bet you’re wondering why I’m not doing a launch or marketing the novel when I’ve just released it. Honestly, I just don’t have the time or the energy for it right this minute because I feel there are certain personal matters that are a much more pressing need at this point. My son is due to arrive in a little less than four months, and I have to pick up the slack I left in my life when I dropped everything to focus on finishing and releasing my first novel.

I guess I’m just in a really weird, restless place in my professional writing life right now. I don’t really know what to do about it. Any advice you have is welcome.


What Now?

So, after working on my first novel for the past eleven years, I really don’t know what to do with myself now that I’ve finished the first edition and it’s out in the world. I’m having this vague, restless, listless feeling that I don’t really know how to deal with.

I know I have other things I need to be focusing on right now. I have MTE school to finish. I have a house that is in DESPERATE need of a good top-to-bottom reorganization/cleaning. I guess I’m just confused because I thought being done with this novel would feel like more of a relief than it does. I thought I’d feel more celebratory, more ecstatic. Right now, all I feel is deflated.

Maybe I just need to decompress for a while? I know I need to look at what my goals are for the future, now that I’ve accomplished the biggest goal I had set for 2017. I set out for 2017 to be the year I finally let Frost go, and I’m certain I’ve achieved that. So, what do I do now?

If you’re interested in my personal goals, feel free to check out my personal blogs: We’re the Moyes (A Chronicle of My Adventures With My Wonderful Husband, Lake, As We Try To Adult Without A Manual) and Chelsea Moye (Random Commentary & Observations On My Life).

As for my writing goals for 2017, I’m feeling pretty vague on that point right now. Completing and submitting Frost by the deadline I set for myself knocked out three of the biggest goals I had written down in my “Goals” Notebook. (I keep all different kinds of notebooks and journals for various reasons, and I also recently started doing my own, modified not-so-pretty version of bullet journaling.) The only writing goal I currently have is incredibly vague: I want to publish a romance novel before 2017 ends.

I guess it’s a place to start? Anyway, I’m going to make a concerted effort to blog more consistently across all my blogs as a collective. If there’s a day I don’t post here, check the two personal blogs for posts and vice versa.

I love you guys!


Amazing Announcement

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That’s right, y’all! Lake and I are expecting a baby! This is the reason I’m a little behind in my blog tour posts, but I’m catching up as of today. Sorry about the delay!


Long Time, No See

So, in my avid focus on trying to make Frost’s initial Inkshares campaign a success, I dropped the ball literally everywhere else in my life, including my blog. The initial campaign failed, and I feel like an idiot for letting you guys down. I just wanted so badly to have publication and good distribution. Inkshares has SO MUCH to offer. Ugh. I realize this is a really informal post, but I’ve decided that I’m just going to be the real me on this blog, without trying to polish everything up so much. Anyway, I’ll be getting back to my Quote of the Day posts and whatnot. See you guys around!


Quote of the Day – 2/24/16

“The only limits to our realizations of tomorrow will be our doubts of today.”
-Franklin D. Roosevelt

Doubt is a trap, and the worst kind of doubt you can fall victim to is self-doubt. As a writer, I know that I have been my own worst enemy on more than one occasion. None of us intend for this to happen, but as a species, we tend to be harder on ourselves than anyone else in the world could be. We have deep, endless wells of faith in others, but when it comes to the self, our wells run dry rather quickly.

Sometimes others trigger our doubts with critical remarks, but you can choose not to allow those doubts to live inside your head. Only you can allow yourself to succumb to doubt. Sure, it would be wonderful to have a broad network of supporters who never doubt you for a second, but even that can’t fix the doubts you have about yourself.

Before anything else, you have to get out your mental weed killer and kill self-doubt in its kudzu-like tracks. Self-doubt breeds the possibility for others to be able to derail you from your calling because you’re helping them rip up the rails! If you want to succeed at anything, you have to get rid of self-doubt and believe that you can do it.

You’re not always going to have others to support you and build you up. If you have faith in yourself, that’s not a problem. But, what happens when you don’t have a support network and you also suffer from self-doubt? What reason do you have to keep pressing on and pursuing your calling? If you’re riddled with self-doubt, it seems like there is no reason for you to keep moving forward. It can be overwhelming, and it can be life-shattering. Self-doubt can stop you from achieving the things you are meant to achieve in life. Self-doubt is the enemy.

As a person who struggles with bouts of depression as a result of Type II Bipolar Disorder, I know just how difficult it can be to overcome self-doubt. I know how powerful an enemy it is because I have allowed myself to be oppressed by self-doubt in the past. I’m going to tell you something that is going to sound a little harsh, but I promise you that it is meant with all the kindness in the world, and it is for your own good.

If you don’t believe in yourself, nobody else is going to do it for you. It is your duty to take care of yourself. It is your duty to do the absolute best you can do for yourself. There will be times in your life when you have no one and no one believes in you (or at least it will feel that way). You are the only one that you can truly rely on to remove doubt from your life.

If you treat yourself well, if you do the absolute best you can for yourself every day, and if you believe in yourself in spite of what the rest of the world may or may not think, a wonderful thing happens! What is that thing? You find true freedom because you’ve created a better situation for yourself. The only opinion of you that ACTUALLY matters in this world is your opinion!  Don’t be afraid to have faith in yourself. Listen to your calling. Pursue the things that make you feel fulfilled and like you are leading the right life for YOU, and I promise everything else will fall into place.

When you take care of yourself, the rest of the world will follow suit. So, practice your calling every day, whether it affects anyone else or not. That is why I write blog posts every single day. I am practicing my calling. I believe that writing more, and writing consistently on a daily basis is making me a better writer, and that will eventually pay off in multitudes of ways. Still, there’s only one way that practicing my calling pays off that REALLY matters, and that payoff is this: I am taking care of myself by practicing my calling on a daily basis.

By taking care of myself I mean respecting myself by being diligently dedicated to my calling, whether or not it affects anyone else. Even if the only way that my writing ever benefits me is that I improve myself through consistency and practice, I still feel fulfilled and happy. The more I respect myself and take care of myself, the less room there is for self-doubt to exist within me. Instead, beautiful things like self-confidence and happiness can grow. The more self-confident and happy you are, the easier it is to follow your calling, and the harder it is for anyone else’s doubts to affect you and pull you off the path of pursuing what you feel called to do.

Heed your calling. Pursue it relentlessly, and leave no room for doubt (from yourself or anyone else). For me, the calling is writing. I write every day, rain or shine, no matter how I’m feeling. Even if I only get two blog posts done and nothing else, I have still practiced my craft and pursued my calling.

Nobody can take the things that you do for yourself in pursuit of your calling away from you unless you let them. Don’t let them!


Quote of the Day – 2/22/16

“Peril, loneliness, an uncertain future, are not oppressive evils, so long as the frame is healthy and the faculties are employed; so long, especially, as Liberty lends us her wings, and Hope guides us by her star.” -Charlotte Brontë

As a writer, this quote means that there is always a way to do what you love. No matter how bad your circumstances are, you can always find a way to do the things you love. If something is your true calling, God will open the doors for you to continue following that calling. It won’t always be easy. Life will sometimes weigh heavy on you, and you just have to decide whether or not you feel like pushing through the obstacles and pursuing your dreams.

I promise that if you let Hope and Faith guide you in your calling, you will find fulfillment. It may not be the kind of achievement that touches others and changes their lives right away. There is NO SUCH THING as an overnight success. Not really, anyway. The things that appear to be an overnight success are usually the result of a lifetime of practice and hard work finally paying off.

Take pleasure in the hard work, enjoy the practice. That, in itself, is a beautiful sort of success. Anything else is just a bonus.


Quote of the Day – 2/21/16

“Sing praise to the LORD, you holy ones of His. Give thanks to His holy name. For His anger is but for a moment. His favor is for a lifetime. Weeping may stay for the night, but joy comes in the morning. As for me, I said in my prosperity, ‘I shall never be moved.'” -Psalm 30:4-6 (www.dailybible.co)

You may have noticed that this is the first time my “Quote of the Day” has been a quotation from the Bible. In the past, I have been reluctant to intermingle my career as a writer with my personal faith. I feared that doing so might push some of my potential readers away. I have also had a lifelong struggle with my faith, which I will explain some other time. In any case, I am a Christian, and my faith is a surprisingly integral part of who I am. So, from now on, my “Quote of the Day” each Sunday will be a quote from the Bible, courtesy of the Daily Bible Inspirations app.

I do not claim to have any sort of divine insight regarding this passage, but I can tell you what it means to me, personally, as a writer and Christian. The message I get from this Biblical quote, in regards to my writing practice, is that I should not be easily discouraged. If I keep the faith and remain dedicated to my writing practice, God will bless me with the resolve and imagination I need to continue pursuing my calling as a writer.

I truly believe that if I prayerfully approach my calling as a writer, that God will lead me in the right direction. I believe that God will lead me and my work on the correct path, and open the right doors for me.

In the past, I have struggled with an obsession with what I perceive as fair, and that has often clashed with my faith. I have been fixated on fairness for as long as I can remember. My earliest memories involve me, fraught with indignant outrage over how unfair things often were, socially, at school. Both my grandmothers, women of incredible and unshakeable faith, told me the same thing over and over. “Life isn’t fair, but God is.” Whenever they told me that, it only succeeded in infuriating me even more because I didn’t have the capacity to understand what it meant.

It’s taken me almost 27 years to come to grips with both my faith and my desire to be treated fairly. It has taken me my entire life up until this point–years of lost, frustrated heartache–to finally understand what they meant. It has taken me almost 27 years to finally accept the fact that God knows better than I do what is best for my life. It has taken my whole life for me to finally understand that God’s plan and my plans may not always be one and the same. It has taken me the entirety of my life to understand that God knows better than I do what is best for me, and what path I need to follow to fulfill my life’s purpose.

I believe that’s what has made it so difficult for me to complete Frost in a timely manner. I didn’t want Frost to be Christian fiction because I was afraid it would limit me by excluding non-Christian readers. Frost began as an exploration of my personal struggles with the idea that “Life isn’t fair, but God is,” and that is the way I intend to finish it. If that means that Frost ends up being Christian fiction, then I’m going to stand by it. I feel called to share that struggle. I feel compelled to tell Frost the way it initially struck me.

I have faith that I am now telling the story as God intended me to tell it, and I sincerely hope that this story will still be an irresistibly fantastic adventure when I’m through telling it the way it was supposed to be told.

 


Quote of the Day – 2/20/16

“I call people rich when they’re able to meet the requirements of their imagination.” -Henry James

I feel a sort of kindred spirit in this quote. I have always been drawn to other imaginative, creative types. I feel like having an active, probing imagination holds so much more value than so many people want to believe. Some people mistakenly equate value with profitability, and that can lead to frustration, depression, and worse feelings. Some of the most brilliant writers ever known to mankind only achieve “profit” from their imaginations posthumously.

A lot of people ask me, “Why do you keep writing if it’s made you little to no money so far?”

Well, I believe there is more value in my writing than just profitability. I find value in dedicating myself to what I believe is my true calling. I am looking for ways to discover more about myself in my writing. I am exploring my faith and my beliefs in my writing. I am trying to find ways to better serve God with this gift He gave me. I’ll discuss that more in tomorrow’s post.

I feel like God gave us imaginations so that we can fulfill our potential and glorify Him, and that’s what I’m seeking to do in my future as a writer.

All the best, and may God bless y’all!

xoxo

Chelsea C. Moye


Work It #13 from A Writer's Guide to Persistence by Jordan Rosenfeld

Work It #13 from A Writer’s Guide to Persistence by Jordan Rosenfeld

Chapter 13: Stretch Your Skills

  1. After you’ve strectched, answer each of these questions.
    • What’s your preferred form or genre to write in; i.e., the one you feel most comfortable in? Prose fiction, usually with strong genre influences, if not a clear genre. And my blog…I LOVE my blog.
    • What’s your next favorite? Short stories, but I don’t feel like my short stories have as much meaning or potential as my longer, more complex ideas. 
    • What’s the form or genre you’ve always been curious to experiment with but haven’t yet? Maybe memoir? I’ve always thought it might be cool, but I’ve never really studied memoirs or given any real thought to what I would include in one if I wrote one.
    • Which form or genre seems incredibly different or hard to you? I used to write poetry, but I don’t anymore. I don’t feel like I have the energy for it. If I had to choose a fiction genre that’s particularly hard for me, I’d have to say horror because I have an intense dislike for being frightened. I’m also not very into writing historicals. I love reading them, but I feel like it would require too much research to actually get one published. 

Can you guess where this is going? Give one of these new, scarier forms a try. I recommend you really stretch and go with the fourth entry in your list, but any will do.

2.  Try your hand at a short essay. Write a fictional account of a true event. Turn a bad day into a horror story. Take a warm moment and channel it into a poem. But please pick the one that feels a little bit challenging so you leave your comfort zone.

Oh, boy. I really don’t know what to do or what to pick. I’m instantaneously repulsed by the idea of turning a bad day into a horror story. Maybe I’ll pick that one. It’s just going to be a short fragment of stomething that could be expanded upon later. I’m going to combine writing a fictional account of a true event and turning a bad day into a horror story. 

I’ve had a hell of a day. By 8:00 this morning I was struggling to hold my eyes open, fighting abject exhaustion and trying to focus on what the physical therapist was saying about my husband’s grandmother’s rehabilitation exercises. I know it sounds kind of bad, but the harder I tried to focus, the more I caught myself nodding off after a long, sleepless night. 

Our black and tan coonhounds Bear and Bryant paced, bayed, and howled all night, as if there were a prowler in the yard, but every time we looked, we couldn’t see a damn thing. The dogs finally got quiet some time between 3:45 and 4:15, and then we heard a nerve-shattering crash out in the shop. 

By the time we made it out there, whatever knocked our shelf of tools and racecar parts over was gone. The shelf busted the Lexan back window out of my husband’s ’67 Camaro drag car. It gouged the crimson paint job in a couple places, and left dents in a couple more, and that was a damn bad way to start the day. The Camaro is my husband’s baby.

So, we got two hours of sleep, and he had to go to work, and I had to drag my exhausted ass to Mobile with my mother-in-law and sister-in-law to learn how to properly do rehab for Granny. I tried to push through and stay awake, but my body at 26 just can’t bounce back from lack of sleep like it could when I was 16.

Then I got jarred out of my dozing off by my husband’s ringtone. “Hello?” 

“Babe…I know you’re at the hospital with Granny, but I just wanted to call and let you know that my truck burned to the ground today while I was away at a job site.”

“WHAT?! Oh my GOD! How the hell did that happen?!”

“Cops say it looks like a Malitov cocktail started the blaze. Everything that was in the truck is gone…burned completely up. My granddaddy’s truck, and some sorry excuse for a human being burned it to the ground. I don’t know who’d do something like that, but they better pray I don’t get my hands on their sorry ass is all I can say.”

He may not have known…but I sure did.


Work It #13 from A Writer’s Guide to Persistence by Jordan Rosenfeld

Work It #13 from A Writer’s Guide to Persistence by Jordan Rosenfeld

Chapter 13: Stretch Your Skills

  1. After you’ve strectched, answer each of these questions.
    • What’s your preferred form or genre to write in; i.e., the one you feel most comfortable in? Prose fiction, usually with strong genre influences, if not a clear genre. And my blog…I LOVE my blog.
    • What’s your next favorite? Short stories, but I don’t feel like my short stories have as much meaning or potential as my longer, more complex ideas. 
    • What’s the form or genre you’ve always been curious to experiment with but haven’t yet? Maybe memoir? I’ve always thought it might be cool, but I’ve never really studied memoirs or given any real thought to what I would include in one if I wrote one.
    • Which form or genre seems incredibly different or hard to you? I used to write poetry, but I don’t anymore. I don’t feel like I have the energy for it. If I had to choose a fiction genre that’s particularly hard for me, I’d have to say horror because I have an intense dislike for being frightened. I’m also not very into writing historicals. I love reading them, but I feel like it would require too much research to actually get one published. 

Can you guess where this is going? Give one of these new, scarier forms a try. I recommend you really stretch and go with the fourth entry in your list, but any will do.

2.  Try your hand at a short essay. Write a fictional account of a true event. Turn a bad day into a horror story. Take a warm moment and channel it into a poem. But please pick the one that feels a little bit challenging so you leave your comfort zone.

Oh, boy. I really don’t know what to do or what to pick. I’m instantaneously repulsed by the idea of turning a bad day into a horror story. Maybe I’ll pick that one. It’s just going to be a short fragment of stomething that could be expanded upon later. I’m going to combine writing a fictional account of a true event and turning a bad day into a horror story. 

I’ve had a hell of a day. By 8:00 this morning I was struggling to hold my eyes open, fighting abject exhaustion and trying to focus on what the physical therapist was saying about my husband’s grandmother’s rehabilitation exercises. I know it sounds kind of bad, but the harder I tried to focus, the more I caught myself nodding off after a long, sleepless night. 

Our black and tan coonhounds Bear and Bryant paced, bayed, and howled all night, as if there were a prowler in the yard, but every time we looked, we couldn’t see a damn thing. The dogs finally got quiet some time between 3:45 and 4:15, and then we heard a nerve-shattering crash out in the shop. 

By the time we made it out there, whatever knocked our shelf of tools and racecar parts over was gone. The shelf busted the Lexan back window out of my husband’s ’67 Camaro drag car. It gouged the crimson paint job in a couple places, and left dents in a couple more, and that was a damn bad way to start the day. The Camaro is my husband’s baby.

So, we got two hours of sleep, and he had to go to work, and I had to drag my exhausted ass to Mobile with my mother-in-law and sister-in-law to learn how to properly do rehab for Granny. I tried to push through and stay awake, but my body at 26 just can’t bounce back from lack of sleep like it could when I was 16.

Then I got jarred out of my dozing off by my husband’s ringtone. “Hello?” 

“Babe…I know you’re at the hospital with Granny, but I just wanted to call and let you know that my truck burned to the ground today while I was away at a job site.”

“WHAT?! Oh my GOD! How the hell did that happen?!”

“Cops say it looks like a Malitov cocktail started the blaze. Everything that was in the truck is gone…burned completely up. My granddaddy’s truck, and some sorry excuse for a human being burned it to the ground. I don’t know who’d do something like that, but they better pray I don’t get my hands on their sorry ass is all I can say.”

He may not have known…but I sure did.


Quote of the Day – 2/18/16

“The weak man becomes strong when he has nothing, for then only can he feel the wild, mad thrill of despair.” -Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

As a writer who sometimes struggles with a mood disorder, I have mixed feelings about this quote. I think that, on some levels, this is highly accurate. It’s true that hitting rock bottom can help you see what you need to do to work your way back up from there, but I think it’s better to live a balanced life than to allow yourself to be completely overtaken by either despair or mania. That is difficult for me to achieve.

I have always had an All-Or-Nothing type personality. I either do something obsessively or not at all. That’s how I’ve always been, but that hasn’t exactly been the healthiest thing for me, or for the people with whom I share my life.

I guess what I’m saying is that it’s wonderful to be dedicated to being a writer, but you should also try to seek balance in your life. Don’t let anything be all-consuming. Take it from someone who knows; when you let things consume you, it can physically wear you down and also put immense amounts of strain on your relationships with the people closest to you.

It’s always better to try to seek balance. Don’t sacrifice your calling for the sake of the people you love, and don’t sacrifice your relationships with the people you love on the altar of your calling to write. There must be some sort of middle ground where everyone ends up happy. Balance will bring happiness to you and all those around you.


Quote of the Day – 2/17/16

“I hope, or I could not live.” -H.G. Wells

I believe from the bottom of my heart that struggling writers need hope more than they need any other human emotion. What are we without hope? What do we have without hope? Hope is the one emotion that can help a writer keep driving forward in his/her writing life when it seems like everything in the world is stacked against him/her. Hope is the one thing that can keep a writer from giving up, even when she feels that no one believes in her or supports her writing dreams.

Hope is the one thing that keeps me going when I feel like no one understands or supports my dream of becoming a successful writer. Hope is what keeps me going when I feel like no one believes in me. There are days when I think to myself, “Nobody in my whole world thinks I’m going to make it as a writer,” but I keep going because I have hope for myself and my dream of being a successful author. Even if that is true and no one in my life thinks I can do this, I will do everything I can to keep pushing toward my dreams because I have hope.

People in my life have told me so many things over the years, and some them have felt like discouraging attacks, whether they were meant that way or not. However, I have ALWAYS come back to my writing because I love it, I’m passionate about it, and I cling to the hope that I am meant to have a successful writing life. I’ve been told that I’m inconsistent; that I have no follow through; that I may be a good writer, but there are thousands of better writers out there. I’ve been told that I’m the queen of procrastination and never finishing anything. I’ve been told that I don’t have the consistency or persistence to make it in the writing field. All those things may be true statements, but I have hope that my love for writing will help me overcome those problems and succeed in the field that I really love.

Have you noticed anything different lately? I’ve been making, at least, two posts a day, every day for the past month, not counting the Valentine’s Day trip to the beach house that didn’t have the internet. Does that seem inconsistent to you? Does it seem like I still lack follow through? I’m making changes in my life that will make me a better writer, and hopefully a better person too.

I’m making strides toward being more consistent, more persistent, and completing my projects instead of reworking large portions of one project over and over for years on end. I’m doing what I can to make myself a better writer. I’m putting in serious commitment and effort. Who can ask more of me than that?


Work It #11 from A Writer’s Guide to Persistence by Jordan Rosenfeld

Work it #11 from A Writer’s Guide to Persistence by Jordan Rosenfeld

Chapter 11: Be Bold, Write Bravely

Okay, it’s time to determine your level of boldness with a set of questions. When you determine what your comfort levels are, you know what “boldness” means to you. Boldness is taking steps outside your comfort zone. You don’t have to take huge, risky steps; you can start with small ones (and we’ll talk more about those in chapter thirteen, “Stretch Your Skills,”), but first we start with identifying your current comfort zone.

Answer the following questions with a yes or no. Are you comfortable…

  • revealing personal feelings in your writing? NO
  • showing your failings or humanity? NO
  • publicly sharing your mistakes? NO
  • using strong language? YES
  • writing about taboo subjects? NO
  • writing about people you know? YES
  • showing people your work? YES
  • reading in front of others? NO
  • telling people you are a writer? YES
  • answering the question, “What have you published?” YES
  • answering the question,d “Do you get paid for it?” NO

The number of times you answered yes or no will give you a snapshot of your comfort with “boldness.” It’s not a road map yat–that’s coming in chapter thirteen. But it’s a first step, a personal inventory that you’ll work with.


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