Category Archives: About Me

Honing Your Horror Workshop: Part 1

Here’s the video from my first writing workshop hosted at The Creative Kitchen in Bay Minette! HUGE shout-out to the owner, Lacey Collier, for working with me and hosting my events!


Are You Called To Write?

Have you ever had a thought like this? Man, I’d really love to write a book someday, but I have no idea where to start.

I used to have similar thoughts, but I worked my butt off over the past 11 years, and I’ve been published in Flash Fiction Magazine, Noir Nation No. 3, as well as having self-published A Collection of Reflections (poetry) and Frost: An Otherworld Tale (my debut novel).

If you love a good story, that love is all you need to become a writer. I’ve invested a lifetime of passion and thousands of dollars in learning about writing craft and the publishing industry, and I’d love to share what I’ve learned with those of you who have an inner storyteller begging to get out.

If you’d like to learn more, you can reserve your seat at my upcoming writing workshop dates HERE. The workshops will be held at The Creative Kitchen in my aweome hometown of Bay Minette, Alabama.

Here’s a fun exercise for those of you considering attending the workshop (or anyone who wants to join in, for that matter):

Describe your worst fear in a single paragraph, but there’s a catch; you cannot name your fear in the paragraph. Post your answers in the comments and we’ll try to guess your fear!


Quote of the Day – 2/21/16

“Sing praise to the LORD, you holy ones of His. Give thanks to His holy name. For His anger is but for a moment. His favor is for a lifetime. Weeping may stay for the night, but joy comes in the morning. As for me, I said in my prosperity, ‘I shall never be moved.'” -Psalm 30:4-6 (www.dailybible.co)

You may have noticed that this is the first time my “Quote of the Day” has been a quotation from the Bible. In the past, I have been reluctant to intermingle my career as a writer with my personal faith. I feared that doing so might push some of my potential readers away. I have also had a lifelong struggle with my faith, which I will explain some other time. In any case, I am a Christian, and my faith is a surprisingly integral part of who I am. So, from now on, my “Quote of the Day” each Sunday will be a quote from the Bible, courtesy of the Daily Bible Inspirations app.

I do not claim to have any sort of divine insight regarding this passage, but I can tell you what it means to me, personally, as a writer and Christian. The message I get from this Biblical quote, in regards to my writing practice, is that I should not be easily discouraged. If I keep the faith and remain dedicated to my writing practice, God will bless me with the resolve and imagination I need to continue pursuing my calling as a writer.

I truly believe that if I prayerfully approach my calling as a writer, that God will lead me in the right direction. I believe that God will lead me and my work on the correct path, and open the right doors for me.

In the past, I have struggled with an obsession with what I perceive as fair, and that has often clashed with my faith. I have been fixated on fairness for as long as I can remember. My earliest memories involve me, fraught with indignant outrage over how unfair things often were, socially, at school. Both my grandmothers, women of incredible and unshakeable faith, told me the same thing over and over. “Life isn’t fair, but God is.” Whenever they told me that, it only succeeded in infuriating me even more because I didn’t have the capacity to understand what it meant.

It’s taken me almost 27 years to come to grips with both my faith and my desire to be treated fairly. It has taken me my entire life up until this point–years of lost, frustrated heartache–to finally understand what they meant. It has taken me almost 27 years to finally accept the fact that God knows better than I do what is best for my life. It has taken my whole life for me to finally understand that God’s plan and my plans may not always be one and the same. It has taken me the entirety of my life to understand that God knows better than I do what is best for me, and what path I need to follow to fulfill my life’s purpose.

I believe that’s what has made it so difficult for me to complete Frost in a timely manner. I didn’t want Frost to be Christian fiction because I was afraid it would limit me by excluding non-Christian readers. Frost began as an exploration of my personal struggles with the idea that “Life isn’t fair, but God is,” and that is the way I intend to finish it. If that means that Frost ends up being Christian fiction, then I’m going to stand by it. I feel called to share that struggle. I feel compelled to tell Frost the way it initially struck me.

I have faith that I am now telling the story as God intended me to tell it, and I sincerely hope that this story will still be an irresistibly fantastic adventure when I’m through telling it the way it was supposed to be told.

 


Quote of the Day – 2/20/16

“I call people rich when they’re able to meet the requirements of their imagination.” -Henry James

I feel a sort of kindred spirit in this quote. I have always been drawn to other imaginative, creative types. I feel like having an active, probing imagination holds so much more value than so many people want to believe. Some people mistakenly equate value with profitability, and that can lead to frustration, depression, and worse feelings. Some of the most brilliant writers ever known to mankind only achieve “profit” from their imaginations posthumously.

A lot of people ask me, “Why do you keep writing if it’s made you little to no money so far?”

Well, I believe there is more value in my writing than just profitability. I find value in dedicating myself to what I believe is my true calling. I am looking for ways to discover more about myself in my writing. I am exploring my faith and my beliefs in my writing. I am trying to find ways to better serve God with this gift He gave me. I’ll discuss that more in tomorrow’s post.

I feel like God gave us imaginations so that we can fulfill our potential and glorify Him, and that’s what I’m seeking to do in my future as a writer.

All the best, and may God bless y’all!

xoxo

Chelsea C. Moye


Work It #13 from A Writer's Guide to Persistence by Jordan Rosenfeld

Work It #13 from A Writer’s Guide to Persistence by Jordan Rosenfeld

Chapter 13: Stretch Your Skills

  1. After you’ve strectched, answer each of these questions.
    • What’s your preferred form or genre to write in; i.e., the one you feel most comfortable in? Prose fiction, usually with strong genre influences, if not a clear genre. And my blog…I LOVE my blog.
    • What’s your next favorite? Short stories, but I don’t feel like my short stories have as much meaning or potential as my longer, more complex ideas. 
    • What’s the form or genre you’ve always been curious to experiment with but haven’t yet? Maybe memoir? I’ve always thought it might be cool, but I’ve never really studied memoirs or given any real thought to what I would include in one if I wrote one.
    • Which form or genre seems incredibly different or hard to you? I used to write poetry, but I don’t anymore. I don’t feel like I have the energy for it. If I had to choose a fiction genre that’s particularly hard for me, I’d have to say horror because I have an intense dislike for being frightened. I’m also not very into writing historicals. I love reading them, but I feel like it would require too much research to actually get one published. 

Can you guess where this is going? Give one of these new, scarier forms a try. I recommend you really stretch and go with the fourth entry in your list, but any will do.

2.  Try your hand at a short essay. Write a fictional account of a true event. Turn a bad day into a horror story. Take a warm moment and channel it into a poem. But please pick the one that feels a little bit challenging so you leave your comfort zone.

Oh, boy. I really don’t know what to do or what to pick. I’m instantaneously repulsed by the idea of turning a bad day into a horror story. Maybe I’ll pick that one. It’s just going to be a short fragment of stomething that could be expanded upon later. I’m going to combine writing a fictional account of a true event and turning a bad day into a horror story. 

I’ve had a hell of a day. By 8:00 this morning I was struggling to hold my eyes open, fighting abject exhaustion and trying to focus on what the physical therapist was saying about my husband’s grandmother’s rehabilitation exercises. I know it sounds kind of bad, but the harder I tried to focus, the more I caught myself nodding off after a long, sleepless night. 

Our black and tan coonhounds Bear and Bryant paced, bayed, and howled all night, as if there were a prowler in the yard, but every time we looked, we couldn’t see a damn thing. The dogs finally got quiet some time between 3:45 and 4:15, and then we heard a nerve-shattering crash out in the shop. 

By the time we made it out there, whatever knocked our shelf of tools and racecar parts over was gone. The shelf busted the Lexan back window out of my husband’s ’67 Camaro drag car. It gouged the crimson paint job in a couple places, and left dents in a couple more, and that was a damn bad way to start the day. The Camaro is my husband’s baby.

So, we got two hours of sleep, and he had to go to work, and I had to drag my exhausted ass to Mobile with my mother-in-law and sister-in-law to learn how to properly do rehab for Granny. I tried to push through and stay awake, but my body at 26 just can’t bounce back from lack of sleep like it could when I was 16.

Then I got jarred out of my dozing off by my husband’s ringtone. “Hello?” 

“Babe…I know you’re at the hospital with Granny, but I just wanted to call and let you know that my truck burned to the ground today while I was away at a job site.”

“WHAT?! Oh my GOD! How the hell did that happen?!”

“Cops say it looks like a Malitov cocktail started the blaze. Everything that was in the truck is gone…burned completely up. My granddaddy’s truck, and some sorry excuse for a human being burned it to the ground. I don’t know who’d do something like that, but they better pray I don’t get my hands on their sorry ass is all I can say.”

He may not have known…but I sure did.


Work It #13 from A Writer’s Guide to Persistence by Jordan Rosenfeld

Work It #13 from A Writer’s Guide to Persistence by Jordan Rosenfeld

Chapter 13: Stretch Your Skills

  1. After you’ve strectched, answer each of these questions.
    • What’s your preferred form or genre to write in; i.e., the one you feel most comfortable in? Prose fiction, usually with strong genre influences, if not a clear genre. And my blog…I LOVE my blog.
    • What’s your next favorite? Short stories, but I don’t feel like my short stories have as much meaning or potential as my longer, more complex ideas. 
    • What’s the form or genre you’ve always been curious to experiment with but haven’t yet? Maybe memoir? I’ve always thought it might be cool, but I’ve never really studied memoirs or given any real thought to what I would include in one if I wrote one.
    • Which form or genre seems incredibly different or hard to you? I used to write poetry, but I don’t anymore. I don’t feel like I have the energy for it. If I had to choose a fiction genre that’s particularly hard for me, I’d have to say horror because I have an intense dislike for being frightened. I’m also not very into writing historicals. I love reading them, but I feel like it would require too much research to actually get one published. 

Can you guess where this is going? Give one of these new, scarier forms a try. I recommend you really stretch and go with the fourth entry in your list, but any will do.

2.  Try your hand at a short essay. Write a fictional account of a true event. Turn a bad day into a horror story. Take a warm moment and channel it into a poem. But please pick the one that feels a little bit challenging so you leave your comfort zone.

Oh, boy. I really don’t know what to do or what to pick. I’m instantaneously repulsed by the idea of turning a bad day into a horror story. Maybe I’ll pick that one. It’s just going to be a short fragment of stomething that could be expanded upon later. I’m going to combine writing a fictional account of a true event and turning a bad day into a horror story. 

I’ve had a hell of a day. By 8:00 this morning I was struggling to hold my eyes open, fighting abject exhaustion and trying to focus on what the physical therapist was saying about my husband’s grandmother’s rehabilitation exercises. I know it sounds kind of bad, but the harder I tried to focus, the more I caught myself nodding off after a long, sleepless night. 

Our black and tan coonhounds Bear and Bryant paced, bayed, and howled all night, as if there were a prowler in the yard, but every time we looked, we couldn’t see a damn thing. The dogs finally got quiet some time between 3:45 and 4:15, and then we heard a nerve-shattering crash out in the shop. 

By the time we made it out there, whatever knocked our shelf of tools and racecar parts over was gone. The shelf busted the Lexan back window out of my husband’s ’67 Camaro drag car. It gouged the crimson paint job in a couple places, and left dents in a couple more, and that was a damn bad way to start the day. The Camaro is my husband’s baby.

So, we got two hours of sleep, and he had to go to work, and I had to drag my exhausted ass to Mobile with my mother-in-law and sister-in-law to learn how to properly do rehab for Granny. I tried to push through and stay awake, but my body at 26 just can’t bounce back from lack of sleep like it could when I was 16.

Then I got jarred out of my dozing off by my husband’s ringtone. “Hello?” 

“Babe…I know you’re at the hospital with Granny, but I just wanted to call and let you know that my truck burned to the ground today while I was away at a job site.”

“WHAT?! Oh my GOD! How the hell did that happen?!”

“Cops say it looks like a Malitov cocktail started the blaze. Everything that was in the truck is gone…burned completely up. My granddaddy’s truck, and some sorry excuse for a human being burned it to the ground. I don’t know who’d do something like that, but they better pray I don’t get my hands on their sorry ass is all I can say.”

He may not have known…but I sure did.


Work It #11 from A Writer's Guide to Persistence by Jordan Rosenfeld

Work it #11 from A Writer’s Guide to Persistence by Jordan Rosenfeld

Chapter 11: Be Bold, Write Bravely

Okay, it’s time to determine your level of boldness with a set of questions. When you determine what your comfort levels are, you know what “boldness” means to you. Boldness is taking steps outside your comfort zone. You don’t have to take huge, risky steps; you can start with small ones (and we’ll talk more about those in chapter thirteen, “Stretch Your Skills,”), but first we start with identifying your current comfort zone.

Answer the following questions with a yes or no. Are you comfortable…

  • revealing personal feelings in your writing? NO
  • showing your failings or humanity? NO
  • publicly sharing your mistakes? NO
  • using strong language? YES
  • writing about taboo subjects? NO
  • writing about people you know? YES
  • showing people your work? YES
  • reading in front of others? NO
  • telling people you are a writer? YES
  • answering the question, “What have you published?” YES
  • answering the question,d “Do you get paid for it?” NO

The number of times you answered yes or no will give you a snapshot of your comfort with “boldness.” It’s not a road map yat–that’s coming in chapter thirteen. But it’s a first step, a personal inventory that you’ll work with.


Work It #11 from A Writer’s Guide to Persistence by Jordan Rosenfeld

Work it #11 from A Writer’s Guide to Persistence by Jordan Rosenfeld

Chapter 11: Be Bold, Write Bravely

Okay, it’s time to determine your level of boldness with a set of questions. When you determine what your comfort levels are, you know what “boldness” means to you. Boldness is taking steps outside your comfort zone. You don’t have to take huge, risky steps; you can start with small ones (and we’ll talk more about those in chapter thirteen, “Stretch Your Skills,”), but first we start with identifying your current comfort zone.

Answer the following questions with a yes or no. Are you comfortable…

  • revealing personal feelings in your writing? NO
  • showing your failings or humanity? NO
  • publicly sharing your mistakes? NO
  • using strong language? YES
  • writing about taboo subjects? NO
  • writing about people you know? YES
  • showing people your work? YES
  • reading in front of others? NO
  • telling people you are a writer? YES
  • answering the question, “What have you published?” YES
  • answering the question,d “Do you get paid for it?” NO

The number of times you answered yes or no will give you a snapshot of your comfort with “boldness.” It’s not a road map yat–that’s coming in chapter thirteen. But it’s a first step, a personal inventory that you’ll work with.


Work It #10 from A Writer's Guide to Persistence by Jordan Rosenfeld

Work It #10 from A Writer’s Guide to Persistence by Jordan Rosenfeld

Chapter 10: Break the Blocks to Creative Flow

For this chapter on breaking the blocks to creative flow, I’m giving you three different tasks, because your reason for block may not be the same each time, and also because sometimes it takes more than one method to slip inertia’s grip.

  1. MENTAL: Quickly take a look at the work you’re stuck on, or simply hold in mind the project you can’t start. Or if you have research materials or other info about the project, put it in front of you. Give yourself the goal of writing one sentence. That’s it, just one sentence. Now get up and do the physical activity in exercise two. Then come back. See if you can’t write just one more sentence. Then get up and do a physical activity. Come back. Write one more.

  2. PHYSICAL: A study done by cognitive psychologist Professor Lorenza Colzato of Leiden University in The Netherlands revealed that people who exercised four times a week were “able to think more creatively than those with a more sedentary lifestyle.” But you don’t have to run marathons or even leave your house in order to engage in a creativity-stimulating form of exercise. Did you know that simply flapping your arms as though to simulate flying, which also gets your heart rate up, is enough to do the trick? If you can make yourself laugh in the process, even better.

    Make sure no one’s around, so you won’t do this halfheartedly. Pretend you’re a bird. Try to take flight. Even squawk. Maybe you’re a chicken. By now, you’re either laughing or flapping, and your heart rate is up. Your subconscious creative trapdoor just swung open without you even realizing it. Return to your desk and write one more sentence.

  3. EMOTIONAL: You may have heard about a somewhat dubious-sounding theraputic technique introduced in the seventies called primal scream therapy. This therapy emerged from the idea that sometimes all a person needs to do to shed emotional baggage is to have a good primal yawp at the top of his lungs. This couls also include pillow punching, phonebook ripping, and other feats of brute strength. Don’t worry–I’m not going to ask you to do this! I am, however, going to ask you to do a written version of it. Set a timer for fifteen minutes minimum, with no maximum. Whatever works for you. At the top of the page, write what you’re facing, whether it’s inertia or creative block, in as derogatory language as you can muster. “I can’t make progress on my stupid novel.”

    Below that, start a list called “Reasons I won’t/shouldn’t/can’t make progress with this project.” In psychoanalysis, this is called the “pro-symptom” approach. Rather than trying to talk yourself into something you don’t want to do, you sympathize with and embrace the discomfort, the part of you throwing its personal tantrum. See how long you can actually go on with this negative sympathy.

    When you run out of things to write, start a new list: “Reasons why I should/must/will finish this project.” Always try to end an exercise on a positive note.

For some reason, this Work It exercise feels more difficult than the others have been for me. I’m also incredibly distracted because my puppy is determined to interrupt me this morning, it seems. It’s like he’s perfectly happy to entertain himself until I sit down to write, and then he becomes the neediest puppy on the planet out  of nowhere. In any case, it’s time for me to turn my attention to the actual work of this Work It exercise.

I’ve been stuck on my novel, Frost, for quite some time now. I’m supposed to focus on writing just ONE sentence of this work. I have an outline sentence for the next scene I’m supposed to be working on. “Lauren, Tamara, and a bunch of volunteers take to the caverns because Adele doesn’t know about them, and they make the Linothorax in secret.”

So…one sentence in this scene. Let me see. Maybe “As Mack led me into the caverns, I was flabbergasted by the sheer number of volunteers waiting to help make the Linothorax.” It’s not profound, but it is the first sentence I’ve written on this project in about four months, now! That’s pretty freeing.

I’m having a momentary freakout because there’s a spider in my room, and I PROMISE you  I just did PLENTY of flailing and other hear-rate raising movements trying to get away from it. I hate hate HATE spiders, and I am 100% terrified of them, and I wish they didn’t exist. It did, however, serve the purpose of getting my heart rate up. On to the next sentence, then. “There were men, women, children, and elders all waiting to do their part to defend each other.”

On to the next part…the emotional primal scream thing. Right now, the thing I most want to scream about is that there’s a freaking spider in my room, and I wasn’t fast enough to kill it, and now I don’t know where it is and I want it DEAD. I can feel things crawling on me. I know it’s just psychosomatic, but UGH.

Anyway…here goes.

I seem to be incapable of making progress on this worthless, idiotic novel of mine.

Reasons I won’t/shouldn’t/can’t make progress with this project:

  • It’s changed so much over the past 10 years that I’ve been working on it that I just feel like I’m beating a dead horse into an unnecessary grease stain in the annals of history.
  • I should be working on my MTE school work instead. I should be prioritizing the moneymaking career over my writing. It’s stupid not to.
  • I should be cleaning the house.
  • I should be focused on making all the people who are important to me happy before I focus on myself. Me focusing on my writing is selfish and irresponsible.
  • I have no followthrough. Everyone knows it. I’ve been working on this stupid project for 10 years, and I’ve gotten nowhere. I don’t even know why I insist on trying to finish it.
  • I didn’t want this book to be Christian fiction because I was afraid that would limit its scope and marketability, but the story disagrees with me.
  • I need to make so many changes to it that I’m never going to finish.
  • I suck at writing “As If” and “SFDs” because I’m a perfectionist who’s completely unwilling to relinquish control of my brainchild. Everything should be perfect and fixed before I move on to the next thing.
  • It’s a lousy, stupid idea that nobody but me actually cares about. What’s the point of even putting it out there? It’s completely lame.
  • I hate myself for wasting so much time on a story that’s never really going to be successful. I don’t know why I can’t let it go and try to move on. The lives of everyone around me would probably be better if I just let the story die and learn to be a grownup with a real job and steady income.
  • If I were any good as a writer, I would already have cranked this book out, along with the two sequels planned for it, rather than letting them stagnate in my head.
  • It’s changed and evolved so much that I don’t know how to categorize it anymore.
  • I haven’t finished my research, which I need in this next scene. What’s the point of moving forward right now without it?
  • I feel like the cathartic value of this novel is gone for me. What’s the point? I’m just wasting everyone’s time.

Reasons why I should/must/will finish this project:

  • It has lived in my head longer than any of my other ideas. Ten years is far too much time for a story to be taking up mental real estate instead of living on bookshelves, where it belongs.
  • If I finish it and get it out there, that would make the people who invested in Frost very happy.
  • I know that there’s an important message in this story for people who share my feelings.
  • God wouldn’t have let me spend ten years on a story if I weren’t supposed to complete it and share it with the world.
  • There are plenty of people out there who have shown interest in Frost, even in its rough, original state. It’s incomplete and it still has over 4,000 +Votes on JukePop.
  • There is a message I’m meant to share in this book, and my soul won’t let me rest until I get it out there.
  • I love writing in the same way my husband loves fishing and drag racing. Why should I deny myself something that I enjoy so deeply, and that means so much to me?

 


Work It #10 from A Writer’s Guide to Persistence by Jordan Rosenfeld

Work It #10 from A Writer’s Guide to Persistence by Jordan Rosenfeld

Chapter 10: Break the Blocks to Creative Flow

For this chapter on breaking the blocks to creative flow, I’m giving you three different tasks, because your reason for block may not be the same each time, and also because sometimes it takes more than one method to slip inertia’s grip.

  1. MENTAL: Quickly take a look at the work you’re stuck on, or simply hold in mind the project you can’t start. Or if you have research materials or other info about the project, put it in front of you. Give yourself the goal of writing one sentence. That’s it, just one sentence. Now get up and do the physical activity in exercise two. Then come back. See if you can’t write just one more sentence. Then get up and do a physical activity. Come back. Write one more.

  2. PHYSICAL: A study done by cognitive psychologist Professor Lorenza Colzato of Leiden University in The Netherlands revealed that people who exercised four times a week were “able to think more creatively than those with a more sedentary lifestyle.” But you don’t have to run marathons or even leave your house in order to engage in a creativity-stimulating form of exercise. Did you know that simply flapping your arms as though to simulate flying, which also gets your heart rate up, is enough to do the trick? If you can make yourself laugh in the process, even better.

    Make sure no one’s around, so you won’t do this halfheartedly. Pretend you’re a bird. Try to take flight. Even squawk. Maybe you’re a chicken. By now, you’re either laughing or flapping, and your heart rate is up. Your subconscious creative trapdoor just swung open without you even realizing it. Return to your desk and write one more sentence.

  3. EMOTIONAL: You may have heard about a somewhat dubious-sounding theraputic technique introduced in the seventies called primal scream therapy. This therapy emerged from the idea that sometimes all a person needs to do to shed emotional baggage is to have a good primal yawp at the top of his lungs. This couls also include pillow punching, phonebook ripping, and other feats of brute strength. Don’t worry–I’m not going to ask you to do this! I am, however, going to ask you to do a written version of it. Set a timer for fifteen minutes minimum, with no maximum. Whatever works for you. At the top of the page, write what you’re facing, whether it’s inertia or creative block, in as derogatory language as you can muster. “I can’t make progress on my stupid novel.”

    Below that, start a list called “Reasons I won’t/shouldn’t/can’t make progress with this project.” In psychoanalysis, this is called the “pro-symptom” approach. Rather than trying to talk yourself into something you don’t want to do, you sympathize with and embrace the discomfort, the part of you throwing its personal tantrum. See how long you can actually go on with this negative sympathy.

    When you run out of things to write, start a new list: “Reasons why I should/must/will finish this project.” Always try to end an exercise on a positive note.

For some reason, this Work It exercise feels more difficult than the others have been for me. I’m also incredibly distracted because my puppy is determined to interrupt me this morning, it seems. It’s like he’s perfectly happy to entertain himself until I sit down to write, and then he becomes the neediest puppy on the planet out  of nowhere. In any case, it’s time for me to turn my attention to the actual work of this Work It exercise.

I’ve been stuck on my novel, Frost, for quite some time now. I’m supposed to focus on writing just ONE sentence of this work. I have an outline sentence for the next scene I’m supposed to be working on. “Lauren, Tamara, and a bunch of volunteers take to the caverns because Adele doesn’t know about them, and they make the Linothorax in secret.”

So…one sentence in this scene. Let me see. Maybe “As Mack led me into the caverns, I was flabbergasted by the sheer number of volunteers waiting to help make the Linothorax.” It’s not profound, but it is the first sentence I’ve written on this project in about four months, now! That’s pretty freeing.

I’m having a momentary freakout because there’s a spider in my room, and I PROMISE you  I just did PLENTY of flailing and other hear-rate raising movements trying to get away from it. I hate hate HATE spiders, and I am 100% terrified of them, and I wish they didn’t exist. It did, however, serve the purpose of getting my heart rate up. On to the next sentence, then. “There were men, women, children, and elders all waiting to do their part to defend each other.”

On to the next part…the emotional primal scream thing. Right now, the thing I most want to scream about is that there’s a freaking spider in my room, and I wasn’t fast enough to kill it, and now I don’t know where it is and I want it DEAD. I can feel things crawling on me. I know it’s just psychosomatic, but UGH.

Anyway…here goes.

I seem to be incapable of making progress on this worthless, idiotic novel of mine.

Reasons I won’t/shouldn’t/can’t make progress with this project:

  • It’s changed so much over the past 10 years that I’ve been working on it that I just feel like I’m beating a dead horse into an unnecessary grease stain in the annals of history.
  • I should be working on my MTE school work instead. I should be prioritizing the moneymaking career over my writing. It’s stupid not to.
  • I should be cleaning the house.
  • I should be focused on making all the people who are important to me happy before I focus on myself. Me focusing on my writing is selfish and irresponsible.
  • I have no followthrough. Everyone knows it. I’ve been working on this stupid project for 10 years, and I’ve gotten nowhere. I don’t even know why I insist on trying to finish it.
  • I didn’t want this book to be Christian fiction because I was afraid that would limit its scope and marketability, but the story disagrees with me.
  • I need to make so many changes to it that I’m never going to finish.
  • I suck at writing “As If” and “SFDs” because I’m a perfectionist who’s completely unwilling to relinquish control of my brainchild. Everything should be perfect and fixed before I move on to the next thing.
  • It’s a lousy, stupid idea that nobody but me actually cares about. What’s the point of even putting it out there? It’s completely lame.
  • I hate myself for wasting so much time on a story that’s never really going to be successful. I don’t know why I can’t let it go and try to move on. The lives of everyone around me would probably be better if I just let the story die and learn to be a grownup with a real job and steady income.
  • If I were any good as a writer, I would already have cranked this book out, along with the two sequels planned for it, rather than letting them stagnate in my head.
  • It’s changed and evolved so much that I don’t know how to categorize it anymore.
  • I haven’t finished my research, which I need in this next scene. What’s the point of moving forward right now without it?
  • I feel like the cathartic value of this novel is gone for me. What’s the point? I’m just wasting everyone’s time.

Reasons why I should/must/will finish this project:

  • It has lived in my head longer than any of my other ideas. Ten years is far too much time for a story to be taking up mental real estate instead of living on bookshelves, where it belongs.
  • If I finish it and get it out there, that would make the people who invested in Frost very happy.
  • I know that there’s an important message in this story for people who share my feelings.
  • God wouldn’t have let me spend ten years on a story if I weren’t supposed to complete it and share it with the world.
  • There are plenty of people out there who have shown interest in Frost, even in its rough, original state. It’s incomplete and it still has over 4,000 +Votes on JukePop.
  • There is a message I’m meant to share in this book, and my soul won’t let me rest until I get it out there.
  • I love writing in the same way my husband loves fishing and drag racing. Why should I deny myself something that I enjoy so deeply, and that means so much to me?

 


Just Created This AWESOME New About Me Graphic With Canva!

CHELSEA C. MOYE


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